gemma

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gem·ma

(jem'ă),
Any budlike or bulblike body, especially a taste bud or end bulb.
[L. bud]

gemma

(jĕm′ə)
n. pl. gemmae (jĕm′ē′) Botany
An asexual budlike propagule capable of developing into a new individual, as in liverworts.

gemma

(pl. gemmae) a small group of cells that serves as a means of vegetative reproduction in some mosses and liverworts. These cells become detached from the main THALLUS and often occur in cup-like structures referred to as gemma-cups. Each gemma is capable of developing into a new plant.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gametophytes of some lycopods produce gemmae that allow indefinite asexual reproduction of gametophytes (Treub, 1886a) and, in some cases, young sporophytes morphologically resemble their associated gametophyte (Fig.
/ Felices animae fatis melioribus usae, / cura quibus primis talia noise fuit; / non illis studium gemmae, non dira cupido / divitis aut auri perniciosa sitis, / sed superum casto rimabant pectore templum: / quis superis nunc est vita beata locis.
Gardenia species, pollen grains with small gemmae intermingled with very
It is of some interest that Isoetes distributed in acidic infertile lakes in tropical Andean sites have a tendency to grow in extremely dense clumps of [10.sup.3]-[10.sup.4] plants [m.sup.-2], due in part to vegetative reproduction by axillary gemmae (Hickey, 1986; Keeley, pers.
Its germlings raised from gemmae grew very slowly in diluted nutrient solutions, with their total N and P content about the same as in the gemmae (Table IV).
The higher values held for small first-season germlings from gemmae, whereas adult plants were less dependent on feeding.
Trichomanes intricatum Farrar and Vittaria appalachiana Farrar & Mickel are perennials that reproduce exclusively by gemmae, even though gametangia may be present.
In addition, gametophytes growing on soil frequently produce archegonia, whereas those growing on rock have high gemmae production (Farrar, 1978).
The gametophyte and gemmae are more tolerant of desiccation or freezing than are the sporophytes of other taxa in Trichomanes and Vittaria (Farrar, 1985).