gaze

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gaze

 [gāz]
1. to look in one direction for a period of time.
2. the act or state of looking steadily in one direction.

gaze

(gāz),
The act of looking steadily at an object.

gaze

To fixate steadily or continuously. See cardinal positions of gaze.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chang, "Gazing Estimation and Correction from Elliptical Features of One Iris," in Image and Signal Processing (CISP), 2010 3rd International Congress on, Yantai, China, 2010.
Gazing globes date back to 13th-century Italy, a country known for garden ornaments, and, more specifically, to Venice, a city known for glassworks.
The corneal SR positions are used to compensate for head movement when gazing at a point on a home appliance.
I began pondering the difference between gazing and gawking.
The study involved presenting still images of faces as cue stimuli; these stimuli included neutral and emotional (happy, angry, and fearful) faces gazing right, left, or straight ahead.
There's a person behind that chest and she may not appreciate your gazing. It's particularly disturbing when the man you're talking to is just gazing down at your top rather than looking you in the eye.
"sitting on chairs calmly watching the approach of the fire" or "standing in the street, motionless, gazing at the clouds of smoke"
To help is to think that we have actually learned about someone's story of pain by merely gazing. To be responsible is to realize how little we know, to be willing to disrupt political fantasies about our 9/11 trauma being so much more dramatic and meaningful than other ongoing traumas, to inquire as to alternatives to industries of trauma.
The user chooses targets by gazing at the icons on the computer screen; the camera, integrated within the a goggles, tracks eye gaze movement and relays input information for processing.
This is a pretty uncomplicated version of "gazing," and does not do justice either to the images or their placement in a space at once public and private.
For example, currently underway is a follow-up to a study that established that nonpredictive gaze direction cues can trigger an attention shift even when participants are unaware of having seen a gazing face.
By these calculations, the software may opt to interrupt a person if he is gazing out the window but not if he is briefing the CEO.