gas

(redirected from gases)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

gas

 [gas]
any elastic aeriform fluid in which the molecules are widely separated from each other and so have free paths.
alveolar gas the gas in the alveoli of the lungs, where gas exchange with the capillary blood takes place.
blood g's the partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide in blood; see blood gas analysis.
laughing gas nitrous oxide.
gas pains pains caused by distention of the stomach or intestines by accumulation of air or other gases. The presence of gas is indicated by distention of the abdomen, belching, or discharge of gas through the rectum. Gas-forming foods include highly flavored vegetables such as onions, cabbage, and turnips; members of the bean family; and fruits such as melons and raw apples. Some seasonings and other chemical irritants also produce gas.
tear gas any of various irritant vapors dispensed by aerosol and causing pain and severe lacrimation in humans; some also cause irritation of exposed mucous membranes as well as vomiting. Common ones include chloroacetophenone (CN), o-chlorobenzylidenemalononitrile (see CS), and dibenz(b,f)-1,4-oxazepine (see cr); the most common of the three is CS (also known as mace).

GAS

Abbreviation for group A streptococci , under streptococcus.

gas

(gas),
1. A thin fluid, such as air, capable of indefinite expansion but convertible by compression and cold into a liquid and, eventually, a solid.
2. In clinical practice, a liquid entirely in its vapor phase at one atmosphere of pressure because ambient temperature is above its boiling point.
[coined by J.B. van Helmont, Flemish chemist and physician, 1579-1644]

gas

(găs)
n. pl. gases or gasses
1.
a. The state of matter distinguished from the solid and liquid states by relatively low density and viscosity, relatively great expansion and contraction with changes in pressure and temperature, the ability to diffuse readily, and the spontaneous tendency to become distributed uniformly throughout any container.
b. A substance in the gaseous state.
2. A gaseous asphyxiant, irritant, or poison.
3. A gaseous anesthetic, such as nitrous oxide.
4.
a. Flatulence.
b. Flatus.
v. gassed, gassing, gases or gasses
v.tr.
1. To treat chemically with gas.
2. To overcome, disable, or kill with poisonous fumes.

GALNS

A gene on chromosome 16q24.3 that encodes N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase, a lysosomal exohydrolase required for the degradation of glycosaminoglycans, keratan sulfate and chondroitin 6-sulfate.

Molecular pathology
Defects of GALNS cause Morquio A syndrome, a lysosomal storage disease.

gas

A volatilized liquid. See Biogas, Compressed gas, Flammable gas, Greenhouse gas, Mustard, Natural gas, Oxidant gas, Phosgene gas Occupational medicine A gas phase contaminant. See Inhalant.

gas

(gas)
1. Fluid, like air, capable of indefinite expansion but convertible by compression and cold into a liquid and, eventually, a solid.
2. In clinical practice, a substance entirely in its vapor phase at 1 atmosphere of pressure because ambient temperature is above its boiling point.
[coined by J.B. van Helmont, Flemish chemist and physician, 1579-1644]

gas

(gas)
1. A thin fluid, such as air, capable of indefinite expansion but convertible by compression and cold into a liquid and, eventually, a solid.
2. In clinical practice, a liquid entirely in its vapor phase at one atmosphere of pressure because ambient temperature is above its boiling point.
[coined by J.B. van Helmont, Flemish chemist and physician, 1579-1644]

Patient discussion about gas

Q. why do i have gas and bloating my bowels are weird and my stomach is sour also. i have pain in the top of my stomach

A. There are many different things that can cause them. Do you also suffer from diarrhea? Do you have diabetes? Do you have pain that is relieved by eating or after going to the bathroom?

Among the more common causes there are IBS (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irritable_bowel_syndrome), diabetes, malabsorption (e.g. lactose intolerance http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lactose_intolerance or celiac http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coeliac_disease), all of these, unfortunately, can't be diagnosed over the net, so if it keeps bothering you or if you have warning sign (such as Nocturnal abdominal pain (sleep awakening), Weight loss, Blood in the stool , Severely tender abdomen , Succussion splash , Fever , Vomiting , fatty diarrhea , New onset diarrhea) you should see a doctor.

Q. I often have gases in my stomach. And it hurts. Is there specific food I should avoid? thanks

A. Why don't you try to run a log of what you eat and how did you feel after that? The digestive system of each of us is different, so it may not be possible to give you advice that would be good for you specifically. If these complaints bothers you, you may also want to consult a docotr.

www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003124.htm

More discussions about gas
References in periodicals archive ?
The researchers have deposited electrode patches on their chips' surfaces in such a way that they impose what amount to electrostatic mirrors on electron gases. With these, the scientists intensify electronic-interference patterns within the electron gases.
As he and other atomic physicists consider other types of exotic matter to mimic using Fermi gases, no prospect generates as much excitement as superconductors.
The venting of molds and cores provides an open path for the gases released from the decomposing mold and core materials to follow, rather than through the metal.
For example, CFC-12, one of the gases scheduled to be phased out of production because of its role in atmospheric ozone depletion, absorbs solar infrared wavelengths almost 16,000 times as effectively as carbon dioxide does.
Hot-off gases enter a water spray quencher in which the gas stream is boosted to saturation.
This year, they plan to use a much more dilute stream of carbon dioxide, closer in composition to the mix of gases that comes out of smokestacks.
The added purge gas volume, combined with the halogen gases produced by the flux, quickly overwhelms the rotary degassing impeller head and decreases its efficiency.
Despite the inevitability of binder-produced gases, the fact that pinholes only occur in certain cases indicates other factors must be important.
In the equation for total thermodynamic pressure of all the gases,
Studies suggest that sunlike stars can hold onto hydrogen and helium in their disks for only about 10 million years, because these light gases can easily escape gravity's pull (SN: 2/18/95, p.111).
The hydrogen content is then determined by measuring the thermal conductivity of the mixture of the two gases. It is an accurate test, but costly in comparison to the RPT.