gargle


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Wikipedia.

gargle

 [gahr´g'l]
1. a solution for rinsing the mouth and throat.
2. to rinse the mouth and throat by holding a solution in the open mouth and agitating it by expulsion of air from the lungs.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

gar·gle

(gar'gĕl),
1. To rinse the fauces with fluid in the mouth through which expired breath is forced to produce a bubbling effect while the head is held far back. It is therapeutically ineffective.
2. A medicated fluid used for gargling; a throat wash.
[O. Fr. fr. L. gurgulio, gullet, windpipe]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

gargle

(gär′gəl)
v. gar·gled, gar·gling, gar·gles
v.intr.
1. To force exhaled air through a liquid held in the back of the mouth, with the head tilted back, in order to cleanse or medicate the mouth or throat.
2. To produce the sound of gargling when speaking or singing.
v.tr.
1. To rinse or medicate (the mouth or throat) by gargling.
2. To circulate or apply (a medicine or solution) by gargling.
3. To utter with a gargling sound.
n.
1. A medicated solution for gargling.
2. A gargling sound.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

gargle

noun A liquid preparation of H2O or other substance used as an intraoral wash (e.g., for sore throat), which is not intended to be ingested.
 
verb To tilt an opened and fluid-filled mouth upwards, allowing air to emanate from the trachea, resulting in a gurgling sound.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

gargle

noun A liquid preparation of H2O2 or other substance used as an intraoral wash–eg, for sore throat, which is not intended to be ingested verbTo tilt an opened and fluid, often mouthwash-filled mouth heavenwards, allowing air to emanate from the trachea, resulting in a gurgling sound
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

gar·gle

(gahr'gĕl)
1. To rinse the fauces with fluid through which expired breath is forced to produce a bubbling effect while the head is held far back.
2. A medicated fluid used for gargling; a throat wash.
[O. Fr. fr. L. gurgulio, gullet, windpipe]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

gar·gle

(gahr'gĕl)
1. To rinse the fauces with fluid in the mouth through which expired breath is forced to produce a bubbling effect while the head is held far back. It is therapeutically ineffective.
2. A medicated fluid used for gargling.
[O. Fr. fr. L. gurgulio, gullet, windpipe]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The aim of the study was to evaluate efficacy of ketamine gargle for attenuating postoperative sore throat in patients undergoing general anaesthesia with endotracheal intubation.
Boghossian, a former retail food and luxury goods executive, says she used principles from food retailing to develop Gargle Away, an advanced formula gargle available in preportioned single-serve K-Cups and packets.
Eventually, I came up with a pretty potent and effective throat gargle recipe I would take with me on business trips,” says Juliet A.
The University of Michigan also released a study in 2009 that found a salt-water gargle and saline nasal spray to be "supported with clinical evidence" as a cold and flu preventer.
You can mix coconut milk with honey and massage the ulcer three times a day or just gargle with the milk to get relief.
Gargle with a little of this solution three times a day.
Thyme is strongly antiseptic and thus can be used externally for infected wounds, internally for respiratory and digestive infections, and as a gargle to relieve sore throats.
* How does your garden gargle? Add 4 teaspoons echinacea, 1 clove garlic, 2 teaspoons peppermint leaves, and 1 teaspoon cayenne to 2 cups of boiling water.
If your throat is sore, it helps to gargle with warm (not hot) salt water.
The study participants gargle and swallow mouthwash containing the inhibitor, consuming an amount equivalent to that in the typical Japanese diet, says Kennedy.
Although formerly advertised as an antiseptic and gargle, it is now mainly used, because of its hygienic odor, as an after-shave lotion and toilet water.
When you want something to drink -- water, juice or soda -- you cannot say "gargle" for Fran.