gamma rays


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Related to gamma rays: Cosmic rays, electromagnetic spectrum

gamma

 [gam´ah]
the third letter of the Greek alphabet, γ, used in names of chemical compounds to distinguish one of three or more isomers or to indicate the position of substituting atoms or groups.
gamma chain disease a type of heavy chain disease that resembles a malignant lymphoma, with symptoms of lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and recurrent infections.
gamma globulin
1. a class of plasma proteins composed almost entirely of immunoglobulins, the proteins that function as antibodies. Production of gamma globulin may be increased in the body when there is invasion by harmful microorganisms. An abnormal amount in the blood, a condition known as hypergammaglobulinemia, may be indicative of a chronic infection or certain malignant blood diseases. There is also a rare condition, agammaglobulinemia, in which the body is unable to produce gamma globulin; patients suffering from this are extremely susceptible to infection and must be given frequent injections of gamma globulin serum.
gamma rays (γ-rays) electromagnetic emissions from radioactive substances; they are similar to and have the same general properties as x-rays but are produced through the disintegration of certain radioactive elements. They consist of high energy photons, have short wavelengths, and have no mass and no electric charge. Gamma rays are sometimes used in the treatment of deep-seated malignancies (see radiation therapy).
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

gam·ma rays

electromagnetic radiation emitted from radioactive substances; they are high-energy x-rays but originate from the nucleus rather than the orbital shell and are not deflected by a magnet.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

gam·ma rays

(gamă rāz)
Electromagnetic radiation emitted from radioactive substances; they are high-energy x-rays but originate from the nucleus rather than the orbital shell and are not deflected by a magnet.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Gamma rays

Short wavelength, high energy electromagnetic radiation emitted by radioactive substances.
Mentioned in: Radiation Therapy
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

gam·ma rays

(gamă rāz)
Electromagnetic radiation emitted from radioactive substances; high-energy x-rays that originate from the nucleus rather than the orbital shell and are not deflected by a magnet.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
While the Moon's gamma-ray glow is surprising and impressive, the Sun does shine brighter in gamma rays with energies higher than 1 billion electron volts.
TOKYO, Apr 24, 2018 - (JCN Newswire) - Fujitsu announced that the array control system recently deployed for the Institute of Cosmic Ray Research (ICRR), University of Tokyo, to be used in the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), a gamma ray observatory capable of observations with a sensitivity aiming to be more than ten times greater than existing gamma ray telescopes, has now commenced operations.
Prior to the gamma-ray measurements with a Ce[Br.sub.3] detector, the intensities of chlorine prompt gamma rays from water samples were calculated using the general purpose MCNP4B2 code [17].
Until recently, attempts to detect galactic center pulsars in large enough numbers to explain the extra gamma rays have failed.
Most of the gamma rays detected by the Fermi satellite originates from within the Milky Way, and are produced from pulsars - which are rotating neutron stars - and supernovae.
(8) Unlike gamma rays, neutrons do not have a characteristic energy spectrum by which an isotope can be identified.
"Gamma ray technology uses the radiation given off by a radioactive substance, typically Cobalt 60, which is a radioactive isotope of the element cobalt," Masefield explains.
Gamma rays originating from this high-activity area provide for subsequent background noise that is detected as real, recorded [gamma]-rays, but not indicative of SLN's.
Then came CGRO, equipped with four sensitive instruments to observe and measure gamma rays. One of these, named the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), was built by a team under Gerald Fishman at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.
The recoil is then vanishingly slight, and the gamma ray wavelength shows no spread due to that recoil.
Extragalactic Gamma Rays. NASA's Fermi Camma-ray Space Telescope has discovered that most of the highest energy photons in the Large Magellanic Cloud come from two pulsars.