game


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game

(gām),
A contest, physical or mental, conducted according to set rules, played for amusement or for a stake.
[M.E. fr. O.E. gamen]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about game

Q. Can you tell me more about Brain games? There are many new brain games now advertised by Nintendo and others. Are they doing anything to delay Alzheimer’s

A. Interesting comment. I'll check the link.

Q. I did a bad movement with my knee during a ball game. How can I know if I damaged the knee ligaments? 4 hours ago I played basketball. I did a great jump but when I landed I felt a very sharp knee pain? How can I know if I damaged the ligaments there?

A. The only way to know for sure is to check! Can estimate the severity of the problem. Is your knee red? Is it hot? Is it swollen? Does the pain have the same severity or does the pain increase with time? If you answered one of those questions with a 'yes' several hours after the injury, you should probably talk to your GP

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References in classic literature ?
"Oh, yes; the game was to just find something about everything to be glad about--no matter what 'twas," rejoined Pollyanna, earnestly.
Because he could not join in the games which other boys played, their life remained strange to him; he only interested himself from the outside in their doings; and it seemed to him that there was a barrier between them and him.
"Then put away the game," he said in a shaking voice to Philip, trying not to look at Vassenka, "and cover them with some nettles.
She revolted instinctively against this Game which drew him away from her, robbed her of part of him.
I would test the lips of her who is to be my slave after the next games; nor is it well, woman, to drive me too far to anger." His eyes narrowed as he spoke, his visage taking on the semblance of that of a snarling beast.
It's a very simple game; all you have to do is to tell the story of the worst action of your life.
`Not at all,' said Alice: `she's so extremely--' Just then she noticed that the Queen was close behind her, listening: so she went on, `--likely to win, that it's hardly worth while finishing the game.'
If his meal is not ready in season, he takes his rifle, hies to the forest or prairie, shoots his own game, lights his fire, and cooks his repast.
He was in high spirits, doing everything with happy ease, and preeminent in all the lively turns, quick resources, and playful impudence that could do honour to the game; and the round table was altogether a very comfortable contrast to the steady sobriety and orderly silence of the other.
To win would have been dangerous, because Mazarin would have changed his indifference into an ugly grimace; to lose would likewise have been dangerous, because she must have cheated, and the infanta, who watched her game, would, doubtless, have exclaimed against her partiality for Mazarin.
And, gazing down on the smoky inferno of crude effort, Daylight outlined the new game he would play, a game in which the Guggenhammers and the rest would have to reckon with him.
"'Tis well," replied the one so addressed, rising and approaching my couch, "he should render rare sport for the great games."