gambling

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gambling

 [gamb´ling]
betting money or other valuables on the outcome of a game or other event.
pathological gambling an impulse control disorder consisting of persistent failure to resist the urge to gamble, to such an extent that personal, family, and vocational life are seriously disrupted.
An activity in which a person wagers against another person or organization on the likelihood of a particular outcome, either in a game of chance, a sports event or other activity for which the outcome is not known in advance

gambling

Vox populi An activity in which a person wagers against another person–eg, friend, acquaintance, bookmaker or 'bookie', or organization–eg, casino, horse race track, internet company engaged in said activity, either legal or illegal, on the likelihood of a particular outcome, either in a game of chance, or sports event or other activity for which the outcome is not known in advance. See Compulsive gambling.

gambling

1. Wagering or betting.
2. Risking something of value in the hope of winning something even more valuable or rare in exchange.

Patient discussion about gambling

Q. Do people substitute one addiction with another? If someone used to be addicted to alcohol and drugs, but is now clean for several months, is it likely that he will develop an addiction to something else (for example cigarettes or gambling)?

A. I'd just like to add my 2 cents worth: Addictive behavior transfers to just about anything; addiction is the problem. Just as addicts have to learn that alcohol is also a drug, we must recognize that addiction is the problem; it is the behavior that is the problem. A common thing for addicts to do is to stop using drugs (including alcohol) and to substitute with people instead, for example, to become involved in codependent relationships with others, or to recognize that their ongoing relationships may also be codependent. It's not uncommon for individuals to go to CoDA (Codependents Anonymous) in addition to AA/NA or GA(Gambler's Anonymous), MA (Marijuana Anonymous)...Others find it more beneficial to use one program (like NA, e.g.), while realizing that addiction refers to more than just a drug or substance.

More discussions about gambling
References in periodicals archive ?
The lack of awareness of the disorder makes it difficult enough to identify problem gamblers and connect them to treatment, much less address the impact problem gambling has on loved ones.
A quarter (n = 7) of the gamblers began wagering online before they reached 18 years.
Indeed, a number of studies on gambling and casinos indicate that problem gamblers exhibit higher rates of depression, bankruptcy, domestic violence, and suicide than the rest of the population.
Illinois State's Attorney Maclay Hoyne led the investigation, and took testimony from a large cast of players and gamblers.
The National Gambling Impact Study, commissioned by Congress in the mid-1990s, reported that the presence of a gambling facility within 50 miles roughly doubles the prevalence of pathological gamblers in the region.
Approximately 97% of the sample gambled for money and 16% of the 165 gamblers were classified as problem gamblers.
Other findings were that all three groups of gamblers were more likely to have gambled for money the first time between the ages of 16 and 20 and the first gambling experience for the majority was bingo or cards.
Although considerably more research is needed in order to report that the competent professional can effectively and efficiently help the pathological gambler, gambling treatment researchers are making gains in this area.
Montana problem gambler rates rose between the 1992 and 1998 studies.
Regular gambler who thought aloud had a significantly lower win rate in number of gambles (F(1, 56) = 7.
Leaving aside that researchers invariably insist that lying is one of the cardinal signs of the compulsive gambler, the point is that a claim of inability to control one's gambling--even if made sincerely--can not logically confirm such inability.