sweet gale

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sweet gale

n.
A deciduous shrub (Myrica gale) of northern Eurasian and North American wetlands, having clusters of small unisexual flowers and aromatic resinous leaves used medicinally and in brewing.
References in classic literature ?
Cape Horn, however, demanded his tribute, and before night sent us a gale of wind directly in our teeth.
On the 12th the gale was very heavy, and we did not know exactly where we were: it was a most unpleasant sound to hear constantly repeated, "keep a good look-out to leeward.
A succession of gales prevented the women from getting shell-fish on the rocks, and they could not go out in their canoes to catch seal.
Jemmy believed in dreams, though not, as I have said, in the devil: I do not think that our Fuegians were much more superstitious than some of the sailors; for an old quartermaster firmly believed that the successive heavy gales, which we encountered off Cape Horn, were caused by our having the Fuegians on board.
They had trapped nothing, and seen no trace of game since they had left the village; their food would not hold out for another week, and there was a gale coming.
The gale broke with a shriek of wind like the shriek of a train, and for three days and three nights it held, never varying one point, and never lulling even for a minute.
He began to sing in the high-pitched howl of the magic songs, and the gale went down slowly.
The three days' gale had driven the deep water of Baffin's Bay southerly, and piled it on to the edge of the far-reaching land-ice that stretches from Bylot's Island to the west.
This morning the gale, by 10, had subsided to an eight or nine - knot breeze, (for a vessel at sea,) and bears us, perhaps, thirty miles per hour, or more.
The gale howled and scuffled about gigantically in the darkness, as though the entire world were one black gully.
The gale kept on increasing, but it was fitful, swooping down upon us in great gusts and then going almost calm for an instant.
The worst had happened; Juag and I seized paddles and kept the canoe with the wind; but that squall was the parting shot of the gale, which died out immediately after, leaving us free to make for the shore, which we lost no time in attempting.