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fusion

 [fu´zhun]
1. the act or process of melting.
2. the merging or coherence of adjacent parts or bodies.
3. the coordination of separate images of the same object in the two eyes into one.
4. the operative formation of an ankylosis or arthrosis.
diaphyseal-epiphyseal fusion operative establishment of bony union between the epiphysis and diaphysis of a bone.
spinal fusion surgical creation of ankylosis between contiguous vertebrae; used in treatment of spondylosis and ruptured intervertebral disk. Called also spondylosyndesis.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

fu·sion

(fyū'zhŭn),
1. Liquefaction, as by melting by heat.
See also: concrescence.
2. Union, as by joining together, for example, bone fusion.
See also: concrescence.
3. The blending of slightly different images from each eye into a single perception.
See also: concrescence.
4. The joining of two or more adjacent teeth during their development by a dentinal union.
See also: concrescence.
5. Joining of two genes, often neighboring genes.
6. The joining of two bones into a single unit, thereby obliterating motion between the two.
7. The process in which two membranes are joined together.
[L. fusio, a pouring, fr. fundo, pp. fusus, to pour]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

FUS

A gene on chromosome 16p11.2 that encodes a multifunctional protein of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) complex, which is involved in pre-mRNA splicing and export of processed mRNA to the cytoplasm. FUS belongs to the FET family of RNA-binding proteins that regulate gene expression, maintain genomic integrity and process mRNA/microRNA processing.

Molecular pathology
FUS mutations cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis type 6; a FUS/CHOP translocation (t(12;16)(q13;p11)) leads to the formation of a chimeric protein, which induces liposarcoma.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

fusion

Medtalk The joining of ≥ 2 distinct entities. See Binaural fusion Orthopedics Operative joining of 2 bones or a single bone with a pseudarthrosis. See Pseudarthrosis, Spinal fusion Psychoanalysis The joining of instincts and objects Sports medicine The trendy combination of 2 or more types of exercise–eg, martial arts, swimming and free weights, theoretically to improve fitness. See Exercise.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

fu·sion

(fyū'zhŭn)
1. Liquefaction, as by melting by heat.
2. Union, as by joining together.
3. The blending of slightly different images from each eye into a single perception.
4. The joining of two or more adjacent teeth during their development by a dentinal union.
See also: concrescence
5. Joining of two genes, often neighboring genes.
6. The joining of two bones into a single unit, thereby obliterating motion between the two.
[L. fusio, a pouring, fr. fundo, pp. fusus, to pour]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

fusion

The act or process of mixing or uniting.
binocular fusion  See sensory fusion.
central fusion See sensory fusion.
chiastopic f . Fusion obtained by voluntary convergence on two targets separated in space and such that the right eye fixates the left target and the left eye the right target. This is often facilitated by fixating a small mark above a single aperture placed in front of the two targets and then slowly shifting one's gaze to the targets. The procedure is aimed at improving positive fusional convergence. See fusional convergence; orthopic fusion.
critical fusion frequency  See critical fusion frequency.
first-degree fusion; flat fusion See Worth's classification of binocular vision.
fusion field An area around the fovea of each eye within which the fusion reflex is initiated. If the disparate images fall within this area motor fusion will occur, but if the disparity is too great there will be no fusional movement. This field is much larger horizontally than vertically.
flat fusion  Binocular fusion in which the single percept is two-dimensional and without stereoscopic effect. Syn. second-degree fusion. See Worth's classification of binocular vision.
fusion lock See binocular lock; associated heterophoria.
motor fusion One of the components of convergence in which the eyes move until the object of regard falls on corresponding retinal areas (e.g. the foveas) in response to disparate retinal stimuli. Syn. disparity vergence; fusion reflex. See fusional convergence; sensory fusion; retinal corresponding points; vergence facility.
orthopic fusion Fusion obtained by voluntary divergence on two targets separated in space and such that the right eye fixates the right target and the left eye the left target. This is often facilitated by looking beyond the targets and then slowly shifting one's gaze to the targets through double apertures placed in front of them. This procedure is aimed at improving negative fusional convergence. See fusional convergence; chiastopic fusion.
peripheral fusion See sensory fusion.
fusion reflex See motor fusion.
second-degree fusion See flat fusion.
sensory fusion The neural process by which the images in each retina are synthesized or integrated into a single percept. In normal binocular vision, this process occurs when corresponding (or nearly corresponding) regions of the retina are stimulated. This process can occur when the images are either in the central part of the retinae (central fusion) or in the peripheral part of the retinae (peripheral fusion). Syn. binocular fusion. See anaglyph; fusional convergence; haploscope; SILO response; retinal corresponding points; random-dot stereogram; bar reading test; diplopia test; Worth's four dot test.
third-degree fusion See Worth's classification of binocular vision.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

fu·sion

(fyū'zhŭn)
1. The joining of two or more adjacent teeth during their development by a dentinal union.
2. Liquefaction, as by melting by heat.
3. Union, as by joining together, e.g., bone fusion.
4. Joining of two bones into a single unit, thereby obliterating motion between the two.
[L. fusio, a pouring, fr. fundo, pp. fusus, to pour]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about fusion

Q. Has anyone had a spine fusion that failed? Or hardware that failed?

A. Haven't experienced it myself, but here (http://www.spine-health.com/forum/treatments/back-surgery-and-neck-surgery) you may find a discussion about it.

Q. I'm having a lot of pain in my right leg after back fusion surgery. Any ideas why? This was my third back surgery. The doctor fused 2 levels. Before surgery I was having pain in my left leg. It is now fine. My right leg however is giving me fits. I've been on Neurontin (Gabopentin is the generic) for 4 weeks now and have very little relief.

A. Thank you Brandon for your input. I have talked with my surgeon on several occasions and he is as baffled by this as I am. His next course of action will be a myleogram. His is reluctant to do this because of the pain and discomfort involved. This is the most baffling thing I have ever experienced, especially when my very talented surgeon is puzzled by it. I do appreciate your input, and will discuss this with my doctor...Perhaps it is a blood flow problem. I have been walking and wear compression hose, with no relief unfortunately.

More discussions about fusion
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References in periodicals archive ?
In vitro diagnostics company SeraCare Life Sciences reported on Monday the commercial availability of an expanded neurotrophic tropomyosin receptor kinase (NTRK) RNA fusion reference material panel to develop NTRK RNA fusion genes to enable labs around the world to validate important cancer biomarkers to their testing panel.
Chen et al., "An integrative approach to reveal driver gene fusions from paired-end sequencing data in cancer," Nature Biotechnology, vol.
Where do you draw the line between contemporary and fusion? Fusion seems like contemporary taken to an extreme.
Earlier this year, two independent research teams appeared to outshine those attempts by claiming they had achieved "cold fusion" at room temperature by forcing deuterium nuclei together between the atoms of palladium or titanium metal specimens.
Mysteriously, the Pons/Fleischmann fusion cells emit a mere billionth of the neutrons that would be expected if the normal deuterium-deuterium fusion reactions caused the heat the cells liberate.
Other researchers' observations of fusion products such as tritium (an even heavier hydrogen isotope) in volcanic eruptions and helium in diamond led Jones and his associates to think that a so-called "piezonuclear fusion" (from the Greek word meaning to squeeze) process might be occurring within the Earth's crust and that perhaps they could duplicate this process in a lab.
Department of Energy, which administers the fusion program, agrees.
However, one of the recent surprisesshows that if the hydrogen isotopes deuterium and tritium are used as fuel, a resonance occurs that greatly raises the fusion efficiency of the muons.
PBFA-II's completion opens a new stage on the long journey toward controlled thermonuclear fusion. As Pace VanDevender, director of pulsed power sciences for Sandia, puts it, "The world now has the best light-ion accelerator for inertial confinment fusion that can be built."