fusion inhibitors

fusion inhibitors

A new class of antiviral drugs that function by preventing the fusion of the virus with the cell membrane of the host cell. These drugs can reduce plasma levels of HIV in patients in whom standard combinations of antiretroviral drugs are no longer effective. See ENFUVIRTIDE.
References in periodicals archive ?
In vitro data demonstrated that EDP-938 is a potent inhibitor of both RSV-A and RSV-B activity, maintaining antiviral activity post-infection while presenting a high barrier to resistance, and maintaining antiviral potency across all clinical isolates tested as well as virus that was resistant to fusion inhibitors.
Anti-HIV-1 agents known as fusion inhibitors target the N-HR or C-HR and disrupt their association, which prevents the virus from entering into the host cell.
Besides maturation inhibitors for HIV, Panacos is also developing small-molecule fusion inhibitors for HIV and possibly some other viruses.
Fusion inhibitors interfere with the entry of HIV-1 into cells by inhibiting the merging of the virus with the cellular membrane.
Comment: Fusion inhibitors block HIV's ability to infect healthy CD4 cells.
Classes of entry inhibitors include coreceptor inhibitors (these block HIV's interaction with coreceptors such as the chemokines CCR5 and CXCR4) and fusion inhibitors (these prevent the virus from fusing with the cell membrane).
fusion inhibitors and "resistant-repellent" protease inhibitors) but we are unlikely, at the current pace of development, to see the implementation of new concepts in treatment.
A member of a new class of anti-HIV drugs, called fusion inhibitors is demonstrating its ability to suppress viral replication and remain well-tolerated in patients in an ongoing Phase II clinical trial.
This could include new class of drugs for entry inhibitors, coreceptor antagonists and fusion inhibitors.
At the conference in Rio we are likely to hear a lot about two different categories of drugs now being tested--entry or fusion inhibitors, which prevent HIV from getting into the body's cells, and integrase inhibitors, which prevent HIV from integrating with the cell for the purpose of replicating itself.
When "small molecule" fusion inhibitors are available--or drugs in new classes, with different mechanisms of action--patients largely resistant to currently available antiretrovirals will have alternative choices.