fused teeth

fused teeth

[MIM*273000]
teeth joined by dentin as a result of embryologic fusion or juxtaposition of two adjacent tooth germs.

fused teeth

(fyūzd tēth)
Teeth joined by dentin as a result of embryologic fusion or juxtaposition of two adjacent tooth germs.

fus·ed teeth

(fyūzd tēth) [MIM*273000]
Teeth joined by dentin as a result of embryologic fusion or juxtaposition of two adjacent tooth germs.
References in periodicals archive ?
Periapical radiolucency is seen involving apices of both roots of the fused teeth [Figure 2].
Geminated and fused teeth have similar clinical appearance and clinical and radiographic examination is necessary for a differential diagnosis [17, 18].
Data available in the literature points out that the prevalence of fusion ranges from 0.5%-2.5% according to the population surveyed.17 Fused teeth are usually larger than normal size with total or partial union of dentin and with two separate root canals.
The fused teeth generally show differences in two halves of the joined crown.
(2.) Ravn JJ Aplasia, supernumerary teeth and fused teeth in the primary dentition.
1) consists of two, fused teeth. The primary (less deformed) tooth is a right M3; it has four transverse lophs, three roots, and is 130 mm long anteroposteriorly.
Initially the fused teeth were separated in the coronal level using long, thin diamond bur.
Dental anomalies of number and forms may occur in the primary and permanent dentition.1,2 The terms such as 'double tooth', 'joined teeth', or 'fused teeth' are often used to describe gemination and fusion, both of which are primary developmental abnormalities of the teeth.3-5 Fusion has been described as a developmental anomaly characterized by the union of two adjacent teeth.
(2) Different terms such as "connate teeth," "double formations," "synodontia," or "joined teeth" are often used to describe fused teeth. (3) It is often hard to differentiate fusion from other developmental anomalies like gemination, especially if the supernumerary tooth bud is fused with the adjacent one.
Fused teeth have sepa- rated or shared pulp chambers and canals.1 There will be one less tooth in the arch than normal if the affected tooth is counted as one2 (Fig 1: a-d) Gemination is currently recognized as an attempt by a single tooth bud to divide, with a resultant formation of either a large tooth with a bifid crown or two completely divided teeth throughout the crown and root.3 The normal number of teeth is observed if the affected tooth is counted as one2 (Fig 1: e, f) Fusion may be differenti- ated from gemination by the presence of two separate roots or a single root.4 In cases where union of a normal tooth bud to a supernumerary tooth germ occurs, the number of teeth is also normal and differentiation from gemination may be very difficult.