fur

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fur

(fŭr),
1. The coat of soft, fine hair of some mammals.
2. A layer of epithelial debris and fungal elements on the dorsum of the tongue. It is related more to neglected oral hygiene than to an underlying disease process.
[M.E. furre, fr. O.Fr., fr. Germanic]

fur

doraphobia.

fur

(fûr)
n.
1. The thick coat of soft hair covering the skin of certain mammals.
2. A furlike coating: fur on the tongue.
tr.v. furred, furring, furs
To cover or coat as if with fur.

FUR

Abbreviation for:
ferric-uptake regulation
follow-up report
freed-up resources 
furosemide

fur

soft, fine hair growing thickly on the skin of animals, mainly mammals, associated with heat retention.

fur

short, very fine and soft hair. Valuable as pelts for use in cold climate and high fashion garments.

fur animal
animals bred or trapped in the wild for their pelts. Includes mink, sable, otter, lapin, ermine, marten.
fur ball
accumulations of fur, swallowed during the natural grooming procedures of cats, can be a cause of vomiting, enteritis and uncommonly intestinal obstruction. Most troublesome in longhaired cats and those with skin disease that prompts more grooming.
fur-bearing animal
see fur animal (above).
fur clipping
chewing of fur by captive mink rendering the pelt useless. A vice apparently caused by cage boredom.
fur mite
see lynxacarusradovsky.
fur seal alopecia
caused in captive seals by overgrooming, a displacement activity. Alopecia occurs on the head and the posterior body, the easiest places for the seal to scratch.
References in classic literature ?
John Jacob Astor to establish an American emporium for the fur trade at the mouth of the Columbia, or Oregon River; of the failure of that enterprise through the capture of Astoria by the British, in 1814; and of the way in which the control of the trade of the Columbia and its dependencies fell into the hands of the Northwest Company.
It is difficult to do justice to the courage, fortitude, and perseverance of the pioneers of the fur trade, who conducted these early expeditions, and first broke their way through a wilderness where everything was calculated to deter and dismay them.
Then she took her little lamp, and went into her cabin, and took off the fur skin, and washed the soot from off her face and hands, so that her beauty shone forth like the sun from behind the clouds.
But this time she kept away too long, and stayed beyond the half-hour; so she had not time to take off her fine dress, and threw her fur mantle over it, and in her haste did not blacken herself all over with soot, but left one of her fingers white.
It occurred to me that a work of this kind might comprise a variety of those curious details, so interesting to me, illustrative of the fur trade; of its remote and adventurous enterprises, and of the various people, and tribes, and castes, and characters, civilized and savage, affected by its operations.
She didn't start; only her other hand flew to the edges of the fur coat, gripping them together over her breast.
She didn't move at all; her fingers still clutched the fur coat.
Jo, repeating, "Ony you tell the young lady as I never went fur to hurt her and wot the genlmn ses
And wrapping his coat carefully round him so that none of the warmth of the fur should be wasted but should warm him all over, neck, knees, and feet, he shut his eyes and tried to sleep again.
he thought, feeling a cold shudder run down his back, and having fastened his fur coats again and wrapped himself up, he snuggled into a corner of the sledge intending to wait patiently.
All that saved White Fang from death was the loose skin of his neck and the thick fur that covered it.
It had taken Cherokee a long time to shift that grip upward, and this had also tended further to clog his jaws with fur and skin-fold.