fungus ball


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Related to fungus ball: pulmonary aspergilloma

ball

 [bawl]
a more or less spherical mass. See also globus and sphere.
fungus ball a tumorlike granulomatous mass formed by colonization of a fungus in a body cavity, usually a bronchus or pulmonary cavity but occasionally a nasal cavity; the organism may disseminate through the bloodstream to the brain, heart, and kidneys. The most common type is the aspergilloma.

fun·gus ball

a compact mass of fungal mycelium and cellular debris, 1-5 cm in diameter, residing within a lung cavity, paranasal sinus, or urinary tract; aspergilloma is a type of fungus ball of the lung.
A tumour-like mass of fungi, classically from the saprobic form of Aspergillus spp, which colonises a preexisting pulmonary cavity
DiffDx—Radiology Abcesses, ankylosing spondylitis, congenital lung cysts, cystic bronchiectasis, emphysematous bullae, cavitary histoplasmosis, neoplasia, radiation fibrosis, sarcoidosis, AIDS
Management Surgical excision of large lesions carries a 5–10% intraoperative mortality rate and a 25–35% complication rate, but, without surgery, potentially fatal haemoptysis occurs in 50–83%

fungus ball

Aspergilloma, mycetoma A tumor-like mass of fungi, classically from the saprobic form of Aspergillus spp, which colonizes a preexisting pulmonary cavity Radiology A solid rounded mass within a cavity, rimmed by an 'air density' crescent; surgical excision of large lesions carries a 5-10% intraoperative mortality rate and a 25-35% complication rate, but sans surgery, potentially fatal hemoptysis occurs in 50-83% DiffDx-radiology Abcesses, ankylosing spondylitis, congenital lung cysts, cystic bronchiectasis, emphysematous bullae, cavitary histoplasmosis, neoplasia, radiation fibrosis, sarcoidosis, and AIDS

fun·gus ball

(fŭng'gŭs bawl)
A compact mass of fungal mycelium and cellular debris, 1-5 cm in diameter, residing within a lung cavity; usually produced by Aspergillus fumigatus.
See also: aspergilloma (2)

fun·gus ball

(fŭng'gŭs bawl)
Compact mass of fungal mycelium and cellular debris, residing within a lung cavity, paranasal sinus, or urinary tract.
References in periodicals archive ?
A total of 25 patients were given a diagnosis of fungus ball of the maxillary sinus, from 2006 to 2014, at the Otorhinolaryngologic Unit of the "Centre Hospitalier des Escartons" of Briancon; eleven were male and fourteen female.
Of 25 patients diagnosed with fungus ball of maxillary sinus from 2006 to 2014 at the Otorhinolaryngology Unit of the "Centre Hospitalier des Escartons" of Brianfon, eleven were male and fourteen were female.
However, radiological confirmation of fungus balls is not conclusive and may be imitated by other pathological structures: blood clots, urinary calculi, air bubbles, inflammatory lumps, and epithelial tumors [10].
Fungus ball (Candida albicans) formation in the bladder.
Aspergillus "fungus ball" of the bladder after hematopoietic transplantation in a pediatric patient: Successful treatment with intravesical voriconazole and surgery.
2.: A: Right nephrostogram showed a distal ureteral defect associated with a large defect in the bladder and a diverticulum B: Fungus ball relief demonstrated a white soft tissue.
The paranasal sinus localizations of fungus ball in the 104 patients are shown in Table 3.
KOH wet mount, Culture followed by LPCB mount from growth on SDA, HPE after H&E and PAS staining were the main methods used for diagnosis of Fungus ball. Unusually, features of Squamous Cell Carcinoma were found in one case in HPE.
Fungus balls are tangled mats of hyphae that are often found in the maxillary sinus.
He reports that some Reticulitermes-termite nursemaids adopt fungus balls that match the diameter of eggs.
Fortunately, SPBG implants are easily accessible to flexible ureteroscopy, thus allowing for the removal of potential obstructive stones or fungus balls. Interestingly, other studies involving renal transplant recipients with follow-up of to 15 years had no cases of encrustation or obstruction.[sup.15]-[sup.17] Perhaps the encrustations/stones seen in Case 2 may have been related to chronic fungal infections.
According to Senocak and Kaur, most patients with fungus balls are immunocompetent.