fungivorous


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fungivorous

(fŭn-jĭv′ər-əs, fŭng-gĭv′-)
adj.
Feeding on fungi.

fun′gi·vore n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, these abundances vary depending on the trophic groups with the highest densities recorded for the phytophagous group followed by the fungivorous and bacterivorous groups and the lowest one recorded for omnivorous-predators.
In the fungi-based food web, collembolans, oribatids, and fungivorous nematodes were positively correlated with fungi.
The most abundant detritivorous arthropods (i.e., Collembola, many Diptera, and the majority of mites) are primarily fungivorous, because they derive the majority of their energy from fungi associated with detritus (Schaefer 1991, Chen et al.
Usually located in major vein axils, they are used by mites, typically fungivorous or predatory species, for shelter and breeding (O'Dowd and Willson, 1989; Pemberton and Turner, 1989; Walter and Denmark, 1991; Willson, 1991; O'Dowd and Pemberton, 1994; Rozario, 1995a).
With the exception of the larger, New Zealand endemic, omnivorous Galumna rugosa, they were short-lived, cosmopolitan species, either fungivorous or herbofungivorous.
Opportunities for reproduction in insects that reproduce by allocating eggs to discrete sites (i.e., entomophagous parasitoids and some phytophagous and fungivorous parasites) can be restricted by egg limitation or by time limitation.
In Little Beauty Cave the relative abundance of two fungivorous mites gives an index of guano deposition rates because Ceratozetes sp.
The specialization in using 1 or few parts of fungi has led to special adaptations of the mouthparts, ovipositor, feeding habits, and life cycle of fungivorous organisms (Lawrence 1989).
For example, fungivorous Collembola and oribatid mites chew, engulf, and digest fungal hyphae and spores, while fungivorous prostigmatid mites pierce fungal hyphae and consume cytoplasm, leaving behind intact fungal hyphae and spores.
Factors such as micro-climate, quality and longevity of the host culture medium, and infestations from predatory or fungivorous mites pose challenges to the development of a successful rearing protocol (Loomans & Murai 1997).