fungivore


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fungivore

An organism that feeds on fungi.

fungivore

an ORGANISM that can feed on FUNGI.
References in periodicals archive ?
Note: Trophic group assignments: F = fungivore, Pr = predator, S = saprophage, and X = xylophage.
The non-pest Australasian fungivore Cis bilamellatus Wood (Coleoptera: Ciidae) in northern Europe: spread dynamics, invasion success and ecological impact.
Ferris H, Venette RC, Scow KM (2004) Soil management to enhance bacterivore and fungivore nematode populations and their nitrogen mineralization function.
Of the 14 sampled families, four have an exclusively carnivorous habit, three are herbivores, two are herbivores or detritivore, one is fungivore or detritivore, one is fungivore or herbivore and three possess varied habits.
In order to examine the responses of predators, we (1) expanded our earlier design by making plots 10x larger, in order to include a reasonable number of the larger predators and to reduce edge effects; and (2) increased the duration of the experiment to 15 wk in order to allow more time for predator populations to respond to increased fungivore densities.
Total numbers of nematodes were counted under a compound microscope and a fraction of these (average ~125 individuals/sample) was sorted to functional group as bacterivore, fungivore, omnivore/predator, or plant parasite (Yeates et al.
Finally, 0.5 mL of both the bacterivore and fungivore suspension were added to microcosms, resulting in an inoculation of 163 [+ or -] 33.4 and 3500 [+ or -] 650 individuals, respectively (means [+ or -] 1 SD).
Fungivore host-use groups from cluster analysis: patterns of utilisation of fungal fruiting bodies by ciid beetles.
They include the observations of independence of lower limit of prey size on predator size (Wilson 1975), of relationships between competition strength and "size distance" (the difference in size between competitors, commonly measured as size ratio) among species on prey-size selectivity (Basset 1992) and of nonrandom body size spacing on both niche packing (e.g., Wiens and Rotenberry 1981) and size relationships between predators and prey, as in herbivore and fungivore beetles and bracken herbivores (Gaston and Lawton 1988, Blackburn et al.
Communities in which the distribution of species conforms with the assembly rule are termed "favored states," whereas those not conforming are "unfavored states." For example, a site with one omnivore, two herbivores, one fungivore, and one granivore (designated (1,2,1,1) in this paper), would be considered to be in a favored state, whereas sites with species distributed as (1,3,1,1), (2,3,2,1), or (2,4,3,2) would be considered unfavored.
Also, both groups of bacteriovorous and fungivorous abound in soil rich in organic matter but the group of fungivores is sensitive to Phosphorus.