fungemia


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fungemia

 [fun-je´me-ah]
the presence of fungi in the blood stream.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

fun·ge·mi·a

(fŭn-jē'mē-ă),
Fungal infection disseminated by way of the bloodstream.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

fun·ge·mi·a

(fŭn-jē'mē-ă)
Fungal infection disseminated by way of the bloodstream.
Synonym(s): fungaemia.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Transient fungemia and Candida arthritis due to Candida zeylanoides.
Approximately 60% of the patients came to the hospital with positive blood cultures on day 1, and fungemia developed in the remaining patients after prolonged hospitalization.
In view of the increased resistance of the Candida species to antifungal agents currently used for the treatment of candidiasis, and the increasing appearance of fungemia caused by albicans and non-albicans species, A.
Among these patients, 36 (15.8%) patients were excluded from the study due to fungemia (n=2, 0.8%) and blood culture contamination (n=34, 15%) (Fig.1).
The clinical significance of positive blood cultures in the 1990s: a prospective comprehensive evaluation of the microbiology, epidemiology, and outcome of bacteremia and fungemia in adults.
Mixed fungemia: incidence, risk factors, and mortality in a general hospital.
OpGen announced today that it completed a prospective clinical trial evaluating the impact of using rapid diagnostic testing for identification and treatment of bacteremia and fungemia in hospital intensive care units in Colombia.
Although new technology has been developed for the identification of the microorganisms associated with bacteremia and fungemia, the blood culture system remains the most reliable and practical method (2), as most of the hospitals and laboratories use blood culture systems.
In neonates, reports estimate a rate of 0.36 % of fungemia secondary to Trichosporon [2], reaching a mortality rate as high as 80% [3].
Myers, "Nosocomial fungemia in a large community teaching hospital," JAMA Internal Medicine, vol.