fungemia

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fungemia

 [fun-je´me-ah]
the presence of fungi in the blood stream.

fun·ge·mi·a

(fŭn-jē'mē-ă),
Fungal infection disseminated by way of the bloodstream.

fungemia

[funjē′mē·ə]
Etymology: L, fungus + Gk, haima, blood
the presence of fungi in the blood, mostly seen in immunocompromised patients. Diagnosis is difficult because routine blood cultures have poor sensitivity. Compare bacteremia, parasitemia, viremia.

fun·ge·mi·a

(fŭn-jē'mē-ă)
Fungal infection disseminated by way of the bloodstream.
Synonym(s): fungaemia.

fungemia

the presence of fungi in the bloodstream.
References in periodicals archive ?
KEY WORDS: AIDS Paecilomyces lilacinus Fungaemia Amphotericin B Voriconazole.
Fungaemia in children infected with the human immunodeficiency virus: new epidemiologic patterns, emerging pathogens, and improved outcome with antifungal therapy.
is in elderly patients and immunocompromised patients, who are at risk of developing a fungaemia, although it is very rare.
Emergence of Candida tropicalis as the major cause of fungaemia in India.
During 1988-90 20% of all episodes of bacteraemia and fungaemia in our hospital occurred in patients aged 80 or older.
Prospective study of fungaemia in a single cancer institution over a 10-y period: aetiology, risk factors, consumption of antifungals and outcome in 140 patients.
Additionally, the patient had a predisposition due to the use of multiple catheters and invasive medical devices, which were considered the possible source of fungaemia, although catheters cultures were not evaluated during hospitalization.
It is therefore likely that the fungaemia identified in case 3 resulted from HLH-related severe neutropenia and was considered unlikely as an initial trigger.
1] Fungaemia secondary to Candida albicans is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates due to the fungi's polyphenic nature and ability to form virulent hyphae in patients that are immunosupressed.
Whether the ability of CRP concentrations and eosinopenia as a marker of fungaemia is different from that in bacteraemia remains uncertain, but this merits further investigation.
It is generally not necessary to repeat blood cultures after therapy has commenced, but patients with fungaemia and bacteraemia caused by Staphylococcus aureus should be subjected to repeated cultures to document clearing of the infection.