functional occlusion


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

occlusion

 [ŏ-kloo´zhun]
2. the trapping of a liquid or gas within cavities in a solid or on its surface.
3. the relation of the teeth of both jaws when in functional contact during activity of the mandible.
4. momentary complete closure of some area in the vocal tract, causing breathing to stop and pressure to accumulate.
Normal occlusion of the primary molars. From Darby and Walsh, 1994.
abnormal occlusion malocclusion.
central occlusion (centric occlusion) occlusion of the teeth when the mandible is in centric relation to the maxilla, with full occlusal surface contact of the upper and lower teeth in habitual occlusion.
coronary occlusion see coronary occlusion.
eccentric occlusion occlusion of the teeth when the lower jaw has moved from the centric position.
functional occlusion contact of the maxillary and mandibular teeth that provides the highest efficiency in the centric position and during all exclusive movements of the jaw that are essential to mastication without producing trauma.

func·tion·al oc·clu·sion

1. any tooth contacts made within the functional range of the opposing teeth surfaces;
2. occlusion that occurs during function.

func·tion·al oc·clu·sion

(fŭngk'shŭn-ăl ŏ-klū'zhŭn)
1. Any tooth contacts made within the functional range of the opposing teeth surfaces.
2. Occlusion that occurs during function.

func·tion·al oc·clu·sion

(fŭngk'shŭn-ăl ŏ-klū'zhŭn)
1. Any tooth contacts made within the functional range of the opposing teeth surfaces.
2. Occlusion that occurs during function.
References in periodicals archive ?
On an intuitive level, poor oral hygiene and the lack of interdental cleaning aids were expected to be associated with failure due to caries, periodontitis, deficiencies of design and execution of FPR, and the associated parafunctions or their complications, but the association needs further investigations, especially for clinical cases with a functional occlusion.
It might be a workable option if it is ankylosed and cannot be transplanted or if it is undergoing external or internal root resorption or if its root is severely dilacerated or if the impaction is severe (e.g., the canine is lodged between the roots of the central and lateral incisors and orthodontic movement will jeopardize these teeth) or if the occlusion is acceptable, with the first premolar in the position of the canine and with an otherwise functional occlusion with well-aligned teeth or if there are pathologic changes (e.g., cystic formation, infection) or when the patient does not desire orthodontic treatment.5
Association of malocclusion and functional occlusion with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in adults: A systematic review of population-based studies.
However, while it is a common finding that patients whose fractures are treated through a closed approach and immobilized with IMF alone have a functional occlusion postoperatively, the same cannot be said about an anatomical reduction of the fractured bony ends.
An ideal functional occlusion with adequate overjet and overbite requires among other factors an ade- quate size ratio between upper and lower teeth.
Closed reduction can be uncomfortable for the patient along with changes in the diet.131416 Moreover in nonsurgical method incomplete anatomical restoration can cause facial asymmetry and inclination of the occlusion plane as well as functional occlusion problems such as premature contact in protrusion and lateral protrusion.17
The dentist must be aware that before a restoration can be permanently placed in a patient's mouth it must meet all the criteria of the optimal functional occlusion. Some of the simple articulators provide only a small part of the information necessary to reach this goal.

Full browser ?