functional magnetic resonance imaging


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functional magnetic resonance imaging

brain activity revealed by manipulating the MR signal to show regional oxygen uptake.

functional magnetic resonance imaging

n. Abbr. fMRI
Magnetic resonance imaging that provides three-dimensional images of the brain showing areas of increased blood flow that correlate with specific brain functions.

func·tion·al mag·net·ic re·so·nance im·ag·ing

(fMRI) (fŭngkshŭn-ăl mag-netik rezŏ-năns imăj-ing)
Brain activity revealed by manipulating the MR signal to show regional oxygen uptake.
References in periodicals archive ?
Posse, "Functional magnetic resonance imaging in real time (FIRE): sliding-window correlation analysis and referencevector optimization," Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, vol.
Preoperative 3T high field blood oxygen level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging for glioma involving sensory cortical areas.
The Cincinnati team conducted functional magnetic resonance imaging on the subjects while they performed a "verb generation task." Subjects were instructed to silently think of verbs in response to a noun.
The researchers used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to determine the effects of caffeine consumption on brain activation in a network of modules subserving the short-term memory of 15 healthy adult volunteers during a working memory task.
Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the research group has observed the activities of nerve cells in V1, V2, V3 and V4 areas.
The team used functional magnetic resonance imaging to record subjects' brain activity during a variety of tasks.
Results from their functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging, or fMRI, studies showed that those with very strong associations to a brand had significantly higher activation in regions of the brain involved in generating emotion.
The functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanner focused on a pain- control region of the brain called the rostral anterior cingulate.
Imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging have given us the ability to observe how different parts of the brain are activated when the patient suffers from damaging stimuli.
Through functional magnetic resonance imaging technology, researchers in the Department of Pediatrics at Yale University have identified a disruption in the neural circuitry for reading in the brains of dyslexic children.
Some of these have been combined with rapidly advancing biophysical technologies like computer-assisted EEG analysis or quantified-EEG (QEEG), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and single-photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT).

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