functional dysphonia

functional dysphonia

Hoarseness of the voice caused by factors other than organic changes to the larynx, vocal cords or their nerve supply. Women are affected more often than men and most patients are young or middle aged introverted adults with a history of stressful events. The condition will usually respond to skilled speech therapy.
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(15) IP has been used as a form of voice therapy for patients with MTD, granuloma, benign vocal fold lesions, vocal fold scar, unilateral vocal fold paralysis, superior laryngeal nerve paresis, spasmodic dysphonia, and functional dysphonia. (16) IP is now considered part of the standard protocol during strobovideolaryngology to aid in identifying laryngeal vestibule lesions and in differential diagnosis between cysts and lamina propria lesions.
Functional dysphonia was noted only in girls and vocal nodules, vocal haematoma and post traumatic laryngeal stenosis were noted only in boys.
The mean V-RQOL score among subjects with vocal nodules (64.96) was better (higher) than among subjects with hyperfunctional dysphonia (59.72) and glottal insufficiency (59.28), which indicates that nodules (organic dysphonia) do not cause greater impact on quality of life among professional users than functional dysphonia. It is obvious that vocal nodules could have detrimental effect on quality of voice (e.g., in the case of singers they may cause loss of the higher frequencies), which is important for vocal performers [25].
First reported in 1982 by Koufman and Blalock, (9) muscle tension dysphonia characterized by altered laryngeal biomechanics has since been referred to by different terms, including functional dysphonia, hyper-functional dysphonia, and hyperkinetic dysphonia.
Includes muscle tension dysphonia, conversion dysphonia, psychogenic dysphonia, and functional dysphonia.
Brodnitz described digital compressive tests in the differential diagnosis of mutational disorders and functional dysphonia. It includes lateral manual compression, cricothyroid approximation, combination of lateral compression and cricothyroid approximation, and anteroposterior compression.
Other chapters address special topics such as management of vocal fold injuries, cognitive behavioral therapy in thetreatment of functional dysphonia, acupuncture and voice treatment, application of motor learning principles in voice motor learning, and analysis of professional voice users in the clinical setting.
Functional dysphonia was diagnosed in 92 (42.8%) children, of whom 63 (29.3%) were in 3rd and 4th groups.
Fiona Miller could not talk after the attack triggered the rare condition functional dysphonia.
Note, however, that there are myriad terms that appear to be synonymous with muscle tension dysphonia, including functional dysphonia, functional hypertensive dysphonia, and hyperfunctional dysphonia (Altman, et al., 2005).
On the other hand, functional dysphonia (FD), although not consensual, consists of a behavioral voice problem in the absence of organic, neurological, or psychological etiology [18].
The prevalence of psychiatric symptoms varied considerably among patients with the three most common voice disorders: 63.6% among patients with vocal fold paralysis, 29.4% among those with functional dysphonia, and 7.1% among those with spasmodic dysphonia.
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