full-time equivalent


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full-time equivalent

A calculation used by an enterprise (e.g., free-standing health clinics, hospitals) to determine its labour needs, defined as the total hours worked (usually understood to mean by workers in non-managerial roles) divided by the average annual hours worked in full-time jobs.
References in periodicals archive ?
5 percent increase in full-time equivalent employment between 2002 and 2007.
The state average full-time equivalent funding in the Higher Education Department's recommendations is $4,051.
Wirral University Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, which is cutting 682 full-time equivalent posts between 2010 and 2013.
NIKE has certified to the state of Oregon that over 2,000 new full-time equivalent workers have been recruited since 1st January, 2012.
But early estimates indicate the full-time equivalent students rose from 8,383.
Fall 2006 full-time equivalent enrollment totals 1,237, up 26.
The full-time equivalent students also increased from 179,868 to 190,439, which is an increase of 5.
In addition to initiating this task, EVRY also intends to make some adjustments to its other Norwegian and Swedish activities, resulting in an increase in the scale of the cost-reduction program of 100 full-time equivalent positions relative to the previous announcement.
The state's funding formula is based partly on a unit called the full-time equivalent student, or the number of credits earned by students.
Since going live, Egenera, a global leader in datacenter virtualization architecture, reports 15 percent full-time equivalent (FTE) savings.
At that point, it would break off from CSUN and become its own university, enrolling about 3,250 full-time equivalent students.
For the fall 2006 semester, the system's 1,918 beds housed over 15% of the campus's 12,535 full-time equivalent (FTE) enrollment (84% of FAU's total students).