fugue


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fugue

 [fūg]
a pathological state of altered consciousness in which an individual may act and wander around as though conscious but his behavior is not directed by his complete normal personality and is not remembered after the fugue ends.
dissociative fugue (psychogenic fugue) a dissociative disorder characterized by an episode in which an individual forgets his past, assumes a partial or complete new identity, and travels away from home or work, in some cases taking up a new name, occupation, and lifestyle. During the fugue, patients are unaware that they have forgotten anything and seem to other people to be behaving normally; following recovery, they recall nothing that happened during the fugue. The disorder is usually related to emotional conflicts due to some traumatic, stressful, or overwhelming event, remits spontaneously, and rarely recurs.

fugue

(fyūg),
A condition in which a person suddenly abandons a present activity or lifestyle and starts a new and different one for a period of time, often in a different city; afterward, the person has amnesia for events occurring during the fugue period, although earlier events are remembered and habits and skills, and procedural memory, are usually unaffected.
[Fr. fr. L. fuga, flight]

fugue

(fyo͞og)
n.
Psychiatry A dissociative state, usually caused by trauma, marked by sudden travel or wandering away from home and an inability to remember one's past.

fu′gal (fyo͞o′gəl) adj.
fu′gal·ly adv.
fugue v.
fugu′ist (fyo͞o′gĭst) n.
Neurology A state in which the patient denies memory of activities for a period of hours to weeks; to external appearances, these activities were either completely normal or the patient disappeared and travelled extensively; most are functional; short fugues rarely occur in temporal lobe epilepsy
Psychiatry A state of personality dissociation characterised by amnesia and possibly physical flight from the customary environment or field of conflict

fugue

(fyūg)
A condition in which a person suddenly abandons a present activity or lifestyle and starts a new and different one, often in a different city; afterward, alleges amnesia for events occurring during the fugue period, although earlier events are remembered and habits and skills are usually unaffected.
[Fr. fr. L. fuga, flight]

fugue

A rare psychological reaction to an intolerable situation in which the affected person wanders away from the old environment, apparently in a state of AMNESIA, and takes on a new identity, occupation and life. The loss of memory is selective and does not preclude use of the previous education. If there is recovery from the fugue, amnesia for the period of the fugue occurs.

Fugue

A dissociative experience during which a person travels away from home, has amnesia for their past, and may be confused about their identity but otherwise appear normal.
References in periodicals archive ?
Musicalization here is modeled on a specific type of composition--the fugue characterized by (a) its polyphonic texture.
The Fugue was impressive that day but stepping back up to a mile and a half this time possibly just swings the balance in favour of Was.
A fugue, musically, is "a composition, or compositional technique, in which a theme (or themes) is extended and developed mainly by imitative counterpoint" (Grove Concise Dictionary of Music).
Let us examine Harrison's Fugue for Percussion as an example of his use of rhythmic ratios.
And changes of registration are used tellingly to articulate the triple fugues nos.8 and 11 and the quadruple fugue no.14.
First, he began his career as an organist; in this capacity, he wrote a vast number of sonatas, preludes, fugues, toccatas, and chorale preludes for organ, some of which were designed for use in the Lutheran service, some as concert showpieces when he was commissioned to test newly built or reconstructed organs.
Each of the indicators has its own melody, analogous to a fugue."
If not as hysterically impassioned, at least until its conclusion, Reger's Variations and Fugue on an Original Theme was just as impressive and, at 30 minutes (it seemed far less) something of a musical odyssey.
But you have to go back to 1992 for the last female Eclipse heroine - Irish-trained Kooyonga - and there's little juice in The Fugue's odds.
Class act THE FUGUE (3.50) hit peak form at Royal Ascot last time and is a worthy single banker in the feature Eclipse Stakes at the Esher venue.
Ante-post favourite The Fugue is a mare familiar to all as a regular fixture in middle-distance Group 1s for the past three seasons.
The first tones of the opening piece, Toccata and Fugue in D minor, BWV 565, reveal that the organist heads for his objective in a manner different to that we may have expected.