fugacious


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fugacious

(of plant organs) withering and falling quickly.
References in periodicals archive ?
She touched the objects with her fingertips in a fugacious and, apparently, non-committal way.
Bob Grant identified Sharp's eye condition as 'fugacious episcleritis' without providing any evidence, see Bob Grant, 'When Punch Met Merry', Folk Music Journal, 7.5 (1999), 644-55 (p.
rules typically applied to fugacious (mobile) resources such as fish and
In place of the sentimentality one might expect from such work, each of the five series envisions this fugacious temporal zone as a banal dreamscape of nonplaces and nonevents.
If I were to tell what is passing in my mind, I should say that every one was specked which he had handled; for he rubs off all the bloom, and those fugacious ethereal qualities leave it.
However fugacious certain contemporary theories may turn out to be, they collectively reflect a cultural condition which can hardly be ignored, since the problems they raise pose a challenge to the nature and pursuit of the humanities as such.
For the sake of synthesis we will mention only the following tendencies: the theology of individual salvation stressed by the great religious awakening movements in England and the United States from the mid-eighteenth century to the middle of the nineteenth century, out of which millenarian and conservative evangelicalism evolved; the literalist "biblicism," which later was exacerbated by fundamentalism; and features of liberal theology which, although somehow fugacious, was sufficient to appeal to sectors of Protestant intellectuals in Brazil from the 1930s to the '60s.
"Le sourire," Muir writes, "est la seule presence": ineffable, ambiguous, fugacious.