fruit fly


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fruit fly

n.
Any of various small flies of the family Drosophilidae, having larvae that feed on fermenting or decaying plant material, especially the common species Drosophila melanogaster, often used in genetic research. Also called pomace fly, vinegar fly.

fruit fly

see DROSOPHILA.
References in periodicals archive ?
In general, it can be observed that fruit fly populations in Tetipac maintain fruit flies per trap per d values of > 0.01, whereas in Atoyac, populations maintain fruit flies per trap per d values of < 0.01.
Olive fruit fly: Managing an ancient pest in modern times.
Effects of Tracer, Tracer bait, and chloronicotinyl insecticides on mortality and control of adult and larval western cherry fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae).
This infestation of fruit fly is increasing day by day; due to this its market value reduces and cannot be exported in international market (Stone House et al., 1998).
In Chayvan, president of Kampong Speu Mangoes Association, said that while the fruit fly has been a problem for mango farmers in the past, most have established methods that ensure there are few to no flies in their mango shipments.
He said, sanitation is the most important factor of fruit fly management and one can analyze the population and take remedial measures in accordance and said about 70 to 80% loss can be handling through crop hygiene method.
He said fruit fly could be controlled by natural, culture and bio control techniques.
Among the fruit fly, the peach fruit fly, Bactrocera zonata (Saunders) (Diptera: Tephritidae) is the most abundant and serious pest of fruit orchards in the world.
Feeding by fruit fly larvae (maggots) damages the fruit internally causing it to ripen prematurely and rot.
Among tested sowing times based upon changes in the fruit characters early sowing (15 February) was relatively better sowing time to mitigate the melon fruit fly infestation and get quality produce of bitter gourd.
That a fruit fly manages to do fighter-jet banked turns in midair contradicts some earlier ideas about how tiny insects maneuver, says Michael Dickinson of the University of Washington in Seattle.