fruit fly


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fruit fly

n.
Any of various small flies of the family Drosophilidae, having larvae that feed on fermenting or decaying plant material, especially the common species Drosophila melanogaster, often used in genetic research. Also called pomace fly, vinegar fly.

fruit fly

see DROSOPHILA.
References in periodicals archive ?
The fruit fly is not our main concern when it comes to being blocked from the international market,' he said, adding that most mango shipments that had been prepared to leave Cambodia had met the SPS requirements.
This investigation will be also help in the identification of pest and shall draw attention towards the commercial varieties of Sindh, which are undermined by the fruit fly pest at the present time.
He said, sanitation is the most important factor of fruit fly management and one can analyze the population and take remedial measures in accordance and said about 70 to 80% loss can be handling through crop hygiene method.
He said fruit fly could be controlled by natural, culture and bio control techniques.
Among the fruit fly, the peach fruit fly, Bactrocera zonata (Saunders) (Diptera: Tephritidae) is the most abundant and serious pest of fruit orchards in the world.
2012) reported that a density of 25 traps per ha was sufficient as a stand-alone method to control the Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata Wiedemann; Diptera: Tephritidae) in Spain.
The existence of fruit fly also means that crops that reach the market are not eligible for export due to quarantine regulations.
Among tested sowing times based upon changes in the fruit characters early sowing (15 February) was relatively better sowing time to mitigate the melon fruit fly infestation and get quality produce of bitter gourd.
That a fruit fly manages to do fighter-jet banked turns in midair contradicts some earlier ideas about how tiny insects maneuver, says Michael Dickinson of the University of Washington in Seattle.
But by 2001, the Oriental fruit fly population rebounded and became more abundant, spreading to many more islands.
First detected in 1998, the olive fruit fly spread quickly throughout the state's olive-growing regions.
A team of biologists led by Peter Cameron at the University of California, Berkeley recently figured out how a fruit fly tastes water--and how its brain detects that water is near.