frost


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frost

 [frost]
a deposit resembling frozen dew or vapor.
urea frost the appearance on the skin of salt crystals left by evaporation of the sweat in urhidrosis.

frost

(frost),
A deposit resembling that of frozen vapor or dew.

Frost

(frost),
Albert D., U.S. ophthalmologist, 1889-1945. See: Frost suture.

Frost

(frost),
Wade H., U.S. epidemiologist, 1880-1938. See: Reed-Frost model.

Frost

(frost),
William A., English ophthalmologist, 1853-1935.

frost

(frost)
1. frozen dew or vapor.
2. a deposit resembling this.

urea frost  the appearance on the skin of salt crystals left by evaporation of the sweat in urhidrosis.

frost

Uremic frost, see there.

frost

(frawst)
A deposit resembling that of frozen vapor or dew.

frost

1. a deposit of frozen dew.
2. a deposit resembling frozen dew or vapor.

frost (1) studs
large-headed horseshoe nails that protrude below the horseshoe, or special studs fitted to the shoe itself, that give better grip on the ice. Called also calks, calkins, cogs.
urea frost (2)
the appearance on the skin of salt crystals left by evaporation of the sweat in urhidrosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ain says they were not rehashing the band's glory days, but "going directly into the future to find out what we are about right now, what makes Celtic Frost now, and be as true as we can.
Eventually plants will succumb to cold and frost and the inevitable snowfall; leave these veggies in your garden.
The team's new analyses of ground-based weather data bolster this notion by showing that some polar air masses containing elevated concentrations of bromine monoxide (BrO) had on the previous day passed over areas of fresh sea ice, which probably sported frost flowers.
We can perhaps distrust the authority of the few extant accounts of this fortuitous meeting because they're anecdotal; however, Frost biographer and Negro Caravan publisher Stanley Burnshaw offers the most persuasive rendering of the moment.
The only plants that survived were cold-crop veggies like broccoli, cabbage and Brussels sprouts, and plots where gardeners covered plants before the frost could kill them.
It was a carefully fashioned image that helped Frost to become one of America's most popular poets, but it was also an image that belied the dark, troubling themes of his work, its preoccupation with loneliness and fear and dispossession.