frontal gyrus


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gyrus

 [ji´rus] (pl. gy´ri) (L.)
one of the many convolutions of the surface of the cerebral hemispheres caused by infolding of the cortex, separated by fissures or sulci; called also cerebral gyrus.
angular gyrus one continuous anteriorly with the supramarginal gyrus.
annectent gyri various small folds on the cerebral surface that are too inconstant to bear specific names; called also gyri transitivi.
Broca's gyrus inferior frontal gyrus.
central gyrus, anterior precentral gyrus.
central gyrus, posterior postcentral gyrus.
cerebral gyrus gyrus.
Cerebral gyri. From Applegate, 1996.
cingulate gyrus (gyrus cin´guli) an arch-shaped convolution situated just above the corpus callosum.
frontal gyrus any of the three (inferior, middle, and superior) gyri of the frontal lobe.
fusiform gyrus one on the inferior surface of the hemisphere between the inferior temporal and parahippocampal gyri, consisting of a lateral (lateral occipitotemporal gyrus) and a medial (medial occipitotemporal gyrus) part.
hippocampal gyrus (gyrus hippocam´pi) one on the inferior surface of each cerebral hemisphere, lying between the hippocampal and collateral fissures; called also parahippocampal gyrus.
infracalcarine gyrus (lingual gyrus) one on the occipital lobe that forms the inferior lip of the calcerine sulcus and, together with the cuneus, the visual cortex.
marginal gyrus the middle frontal gyrus.
occipital gyrus any of the three (superior, middle, and inferior) gyri of the occipital lobe.
occipitotemporal gyrus, lateral the lateral portion of the fusiform gyrus.
occipitotemporal gyrus, medial the medial portion of the fusiform gyrus.
orbital gyri irregular gyri on the orbital surface of the frontal lobe.
parahippocampal gyrus hippocampal gyrus.
paraterminal gyrus a thin sheet of gray matter in front of and ventral to the genu of the corpus callosum.
postcentral gyrus the convolution of the frontal lobe immediately behind the central sulcus; the primary sensory area of the cerebral cortex; called also posterior central gyrus.
precentral gyrus the convolution of the frontal lobe immediately in front of the central sulcus; the primary motor area of the cerebral cortex; called also anterior central gyrus.
gyrus rec´tus a cerebral convolution on the orbital aspect of the frontal lobe.
supramarginal gyrus that part of the inferior parietal convolution which curves around the upper end of the fissure of Sylvius.
temporal gyrus any of the gyri of the temporal lobe, including inferior, middle, superior, and transverse temporal gyri; the more prominent of the latter (anterior transverse temporal gyrus) represents the cortical center for hearing.
gy´ri transiti´vi annectent gyri.
uncinate gyrus the uncus.

frontal gyrus

n.
1. A broad convolution on the convexity of the frontal lobe of the cerebrum between the inferior frontal sulcus and the sylvian fissure, divided by branches of the sylvian fissure into three parts; inferior frontal gyrus.
2. A convolution on the convexity of each frontal lobe of the cerebrum running from front to back between the superior and inferior frontal sulci; middle frontal gyrus.
3. A broad convolution running from front to back on the medial edges of the convex surface and of each frontal lobe; superior frontal gyrus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most of these studies found abnormalities in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), [7] medial frontal gyrus, [8] anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), [9,10] amygdala, medial thalamus, and striatum.
The decreased putamen DC value and increased left superior frontal gyrus DC value in all patients and the relationship between symptoms and DC value are the best evidence.
Li and colleagues found higher FA and AD in the truncus and genu of the corpus callosum and in the right superior frontal gyrus among individuals with OCD, but did not find any differences in the RD; furthermore, the FA value in the left middle temporal lobe was positively correlated with the severity of OCD symptoms.
By doing this, the brain imaging showed that new nouns primarily activate the left fusiform gyrus (the underside of the temporal lobe associated with visual and object processing), while the new verbs activated part of the left posterior medial temporal gyrus (associated with semantic and conceptual aspects) and the left inferior frontal gyrus (involved in processing grammar).
When viewing sexual pictures, female OCD patients showed more activation in the medial frontal gyrus, precuneus, right cingulate gyrus, and left insula, compared with controls.
These regions include the inferior frontal gyrus, or Broca's area, in the front left side of the brain, and the posterior temporal region, commonly referred to as Wernicke's area, toward the back left side of the brain.
Specifically, there was significantly greater activation of the left middle frontal gyrus and a trend toward greater activation of the right inferior parietal regions when CPAP was withdrawn.
However, the second scan result found that the activated areas had widened to the frontal gyrus and inferior frontal gyrus, which are significant areas in working memory and decision-making.
Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans of subjects engaged in this task demonstrated that the group with higher cardiovascular fitness had significantly greater activity in the medial frontal gyrus, the superior frontal gyrus, and the inferior parietal lobule, and significantly lower activity in the anterior cingulate cortex.
They analysed the brain activity of 11 students, and found that idiomatic sentences activated the right middle temporal gyrus (after 350ms) and the right medial frontal gyrus (at 270-300 and 500-780ms).
These participants also showed reduced brain activity in one brain structure - the right posterior inferior frontal gyrus - after a normal waking day.
The noxious thermal stimulus induced greater activation than the pain video in the medial orbitofrontal cortex, a region implicated in the perception of reinforcing stimuli and the experience of emotion, and also in the middle frontal gyrus, a region immplicated in the cognitive interpretation and reappraisal of emotional stimuli.