frog

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Related to frogs: Anura

frog

(frog),
1. An amphibian in the order Anura, which includes the toads; the commonest frog genera are Rana (grass frogs) and Hyla (tree frogs).
2. In veterinary medicine, the spongy triangular cushion on the sole of the horse hoof that helps to absorb the shock of impact.
[A.S. frogge]

frog

(frôg, frŏg)
n.
1.
a. Any of numerous tailless aquatic, semiaquatic, or terrestrial amphibians of the order Anura, characteristically having a short vertebral column, a large head, long hind legs used for leaping, and a tadpole stage as larvae.
b. Any of various usually aquatic members of this order having smoother skin and longer hind legs than the toads.
2. A wedge-shaped, horny prominence in the sole of a horse's hoof.
3. Informal Hoarseness or phlegm in the throat.
French ROtoblator Group Study

frog

see ANURAN.
References in classic literature ?
This was evidently the Moral: so Sylvie made her final proclamation to the Frogs. "The Story's finished!
I did not feel quite clear about it myself, so made no suggestion: but the Frogs seemed quite content, Moral or no Moral, and merely raised a husky chorus of "Off!
"He's down in the ditch there," said Sylvie, "amusing a young Frog."
What--would oo like?' he shouted into the ear of the Frog: but the little creature sat quite still, and took no notice of him.
Another of Yang's ingenious ideas was the "froglet apartment," where the half-water, half-land environment allows baby frogs to adapt to their post-metamorphosis lives more easily.
Eat that frog! is a book which is written by motivational public speaker and self-development author Brian Tracy.
The frogs will have hibernated in your pond or the logs around it.
The fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, commonly known as chytrid fungus, attacks frogs' skin, which they use to breathe, and damages their nervous system.
A study released Monday examined why Panama's tiny tungara frogs adapt their mating calls in urban areas -- an unexpected example of how animals change communication strategies when cities encroach on forests.
The carrier of the deadly virus, Aedes aegypti, is multiplying by the millions, while scientists and local communities, racing against time, wanted to turn back to frogs for help after the man-made medicine is failing.
This tiny frog was recently discovered by scientists in India.