friction


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Related to friction: coefficient of friction

friction

 [frik´shun]
the act of rubbing.

fric·tion

(frik'shŭn),
1. The act of rubbing the surface of an object against that of another.
2. The force required for relative motion of two bodies that are in contact.
[L. frictio, fr. frico, to rub]

friction

/fric·tion/ (frik´shun)
1. the act of rubbing.
2. massage using a circular or back-and-forth rubbing movement, used especially for massage of deep tissues.

friction

[frik′shən]
Etymology: L, fricare, to rub
1 the act of rubbing one object against another. See also attrition.
2 a type of massage in which deeper tissues are stroked or rubbed, usually through strong circular movements of the hand. See also massage.
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Friction massage

friction

A soft tissue massage technique, which entails the use of small circular pressure strokes from the fingertips, thumb pads and palms, with the intent of mobilising stiff joints and enhancing the circulation of blood to tendons and ligaments.

fric·tion

(frik'shŭn)
1. The act of rubbing the surface of an object against that of another; especially rubbing the limbs of the body to aid the circulation.
2. The force required for relative motion of two bodies that are in contact.
3. A group of movements in massage intended to move superficial layers over deeper structures, to reach deeper tissues, or to create heat. Includes static, cross-fiber, with-fiber, and circular frictions.
[L. frictio, fr. frico, to rub]

friction

the force between the surfaces of two objects in contact, at least one of which is moving (or tending to move) relative to the other. kinetic friction friction due to motion of one object relative to another; also known as dynamic friction. coefficient of friction dimensionless (no units) number representing friction between two bodies or objects. Calculated as the force parallel to the object or surface (tangential force) divided by the force perpendicular to the object or surface (normal force).

friction

surface force generated by movement or potential movement of body part at a surface interface; generates heat and impedes movement of body part relative to the interface; friction forces resist actual or potential sliding of one object against another; heat generated by friction at skin surfaces promotes increased metabolic rate of local epidermis, and callus formation

friction,

n massage technique that uses superficial tissue to engage deeper layers. Friction increases circulation and fibroblast activity.

fric·tion

(frik'shŭn)
1. The act of rubbing the surface of an object against that of another; especially rubbing the limbs of the body to aid the circulation.
2. The force required for relative motion of two bodies that are in contact.
[L. frictio, fr. frico, to rub]

friction,

n the resistance to movement as one object is moved across the other, usually creating heat.

friction

the act of rubbing.

friction coefficient
see friction coefficient.
friction injury
caused most commonly by automobile trauma in dogs and cats in which the animal has been dragged along the road or pavement, causing avulsion of tissue, from skin through to ligaments, tendons, muscles and bone. See also friction burn.
friction rub
sound heard on auscultation caused by rubbing together of two inflamed surfaces, e.g. pleuritic friction rub. See also pleural friction rub.
References in classic literature ?
109 the borer is described, but the friction of this upon the fireblock (to which the phrase `held firmly' clearly belongs) must also have been mentioned.
I merely mention the circumstance to show that you are no ordinary person, that there is a constant friction perpetually going on between your mind and your body; and that you must be soothed and tended.
Still, Barbicane was a long time coming to himself, which frightened his friends, who did not spare friction.
God has mitigated the sufferings that arise from social friction by a religious sentiment which raises self-forgetfulness into a virtue; just as He has moderated the friction of the mechanism of the universe by laws which we do not know.
If the injustice is part of the necessary friction of the machine of government, let it go, let it go; perchance it will wear smooth -- certainly the machine will wear out.
He had learned that continued friction would wear through the strands of his rope, though it was many years before this knowledge did more for him than merely to keep him from swinging too long at a time, or too far above the ground at the end of his rope.
To say the truth, as they both operate by friction, it may be doubted whether there is not something analogous between them, of which Mr Freke would do well to enquire, before he publishes the next edition of his book.
This meant a soft trail, greater friction on the runners, and heavier pulling for the dogs; yet the drivers were fair through it all, and did their best for the animals.
He stooped to tickle James, who had finished stropping his claws and was now enjoying a friction massage against his leg, and began to brood on the inscrutable way of Fate.
A natural exudation of the animal might assist in overcoming the friction, and a powerful momentum be obtained.
If any other corroborative testimony had been required, it would have been abundantly furnished in the actions of Miss Miggs, who, having arrived at that restless state and sensitive condition of the nervous system which are the result of long watching, did, by a constant rubbing and tweaking of her nose, a perpetual change of position (arising from the sudden growth of imaginary knots and knobs in her chair), a frequent friction of her eyebrows, the incessant recurrence of a small cough, a small groan, a gasp, a sigh, a sniff, a spasmodic start, and by other demonstrations of that nature, so file down and rasp, as it were, the patience of the locksmith, that after looking at her in silence for some time, he at last broke out into this apostrophe:--
Iteration, like friction, is likely to generate heat instead of progress, and Mr.