freezing


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Related to freezing: freezing cold

freez·ing

(frē'zing),
1. The temperature below which a liquid becomes solid.
2. Congealing, stiffening, or hardening by exposure to cold.

freezing

a sudden inability to initiate or continue repetitive motor activity of patients with Parkinson's disease. The patient may be unable to take the first step in walking or, if walking, may find a real or imagined obstacle that causes the feet to remain in one spot.

freez·ing

(frēz'ing)
Congealing, stiffening, or hardening by exposure to cold.

freezing

reducing the temperature of materials to the freezing point of water so that they are frozen solid. Used in the preservation of food, the preparation of material for histopathological examination and in cryosurgery.

freezing point
the temperature at which a liquid begins to freeze; for water, the freezing point is 32°F (0°C).
quick freezing
greatly improves the quality of meat because of reduced ice crystal formation.
skin freezing

Patient discussion about freezing

Q. why my hands are getting purple and freezing?

A. thank you, but these answers are not correct answers for my question

More discussions about freezing
References in periodicals archive ?
Fish head and guts are generally not considered to be the most exciting foods in the world, but this lucky fellow represents a paradigm shift in freezing technology.
The actual freezing point of the solution is obtained in the region after the super-cooling has stopped.
The graphite, up to this precipitation point, has been dissolved in the molten gray iron as elemental carbon, but the introduction of the inoculant facilitates the carbon coming out of solution as graphite when the eutectic freezing point is reached as the metal cools.
Since spermatogonia of all species appear similar, the freezing of human sperm stem cells is probably feasible, Brinster says.
C laboratory chamber, where they could measure temperatures at different locations and examine their blood for clues of freezing survival mechanisms.
While four frog species share a similar tolerance to freezing, the painted turtle is the only reptile and "the highest vertebrate life form known to tolerate the natural freezing of extracellular body fluids during winter hibernation," write Kenneth B.