free-living


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free-living

(frē′lĭv′ĭng)
adj.
1. Given to self-indulgence.
2. Biology
a. Living independently of another organism; not part of a parasitic or symbiotic relationship.
b. Moving independently; not sessile.
References in periodicals archive ?
Biolms augment the number of free-living amoebae in dental unit water lines.
Twelve fish species, including 5 carapids and 7 species of free-living fishes, were used in the analyses.
fowleri, the single causative agent of PAM, is a free-living, thermophilic amoeboflagellate that thrives in many types of warm freshwater, including shallow inland lakes, geothermal springs, warm water discharges from electrical power plants, and even domestic water supplies in the US and throughout the temperate world.
Studies after stroke have found lower levels of free-living physical activity than normal.
In addition to their direct pathogenicity, free-living amebae are receiving increasing attention as reservoirs and potential vehicles for the transmission of bacteria in the environment.
The fact that our patient died of Acanthamoeba encephalitis is striking because rituximab is believed to interfere with humoral immunity, which is not known to play a major role against free-living amebic infections.
Firstly, the naturally occurring, free-living soil fungus has a tough-walled 'chlamydospore', which can survive passage through the gut of sheep, cattle, horses and pigs.
You might see what David Nimmons does: "[The gay world] looks like an experiment in a free-living spirituality," he says.
Three stages of embryo development were identified according to Gauld (1): stage 1 (candled embryos)--eggs, apparently fertilized, are present in a protective capsule in the uteri; stage 2 (free-living embryos)--the candle has ruptured and embryos bearing an external yolk sac are free in the uteri; and stage 3 (full term embryos)--fully developed embryos are present in the uteri.
In an earlier analysis using a reconstructed copepod phylogeny, Poulin (1995a) found that transitions from free-living to parasitic on invertebrates were typically followed by small increases in female body size, and that switching from invertebrate hosts to fish hosts led to much larger increases in female body size.
These analyte data for healthy free-living mottled ducks may be useful in the assessment of mottled duck population health and in the management and treatment of individual ducks affected by environmental stressors.