free flap


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Related to free flap: pedicle flap

flap

 [flap]
1. a mass of tissue for grafting, usually including skin, only partially removed from one part of the body so that it retains its own blood supply during transfer to another site.
2. an uncontrolled movement.
advancement flap sliding flap.
axial pattern flap a myocutaneous flap containing an artery in its long axis.
free flap an island flap detached from the body and reattached at the distant recipient site by microvascular anastomosis.
island flap a flap consisting of skin and subcutaneous tissue, with a pedicle made up of only the nutrient vessels.
jump flap one cut from the abdomen and attached to a flap of the same size on the forearm. The forearm flap is transferred later to some other part of the body to fill a defect there.
myocutaneous flap a compound flap of skin and muscle with adequate vascularity to permit sufficient tissue to be transferred to the recipient site. See also axial pattern flap and random pattern flap.
pedicle flap a flap consisting of the full thickness of the skin and the subcutaneous tissue, attached by tissue through which it receives its blood supply. Called also pedicle graft.
random pattern flap a myocutaneous flap with a random pattern of arteries, as opposed to an axial pattern flap.
rope flap tube flap.
rotation flap a local pedicle flap whose width is increased by having the edge distal to the defect form a curved line; the flap is then rotated and a counterincision is made at the base of the curved line, which increases the mobility of the flap.
skin flap a full-thickness mass or flap of tissue containing epidermis, dermis, and subcutaneous tissue.
sliding flap a flap carried to its new position by a sliding technique; called also advancement flap.
tube flap (tubed pedicle flap) a bipedicle flap made by elevating a long strip of tissue from its bed except at the two extremities, the cut edges then being sutured together to form a tube.

free flap

flap in which the donor vessels are divided, the tissue is transported to another area, and the flap is revascularized by anastomosis of vessels in the recipient bed to the artery and vein(s) of the flap.

free flap

Reconstructive surgery An autologous tissue flap with anastomosed blood vessels

free flap

(frē flap)
Island flap in which the donor vessels are severed proximally, the flap is transported as a free object to the recipient area, and the flap is revascularized by anastomosing its supplying vessels to vessels there.

Free flap

A section of tissue detached from its blood supply, moved to another part of the body, and reattached by microsurgery to a new blood supply.
Mentioned in: Breast Reconstruction
References in periodicals archive ?
Infection Rate among different Types of Reconstruction Primary 6 Local 0 Regional 21.4 Free flap 21.4 Note: Table made from bar graph.
Free flaps used for reconstruction were: Antero lateral thigh free flap (ALTF) (n=8, 40%), Radial forearm free flap (RFFF) (n=6, 30%), free latissimus dorsi (n=4, 20%), Transversus Abdominis muscle (TRAM) flap (n=2, 10%).
M: male; F: female; TR: tumor recurrence; RT: radiotherapy; DM: type 2 diabetes mellitus; HT: hypertension; CRF: chronic renal failure; COPD: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; FFF: free flap failure; PFN: partial flap necrosis; TFN: total flap necrosis; PO: early postoperative period; 2+: at the 2nd year of follow-up
Radial Forearm Free Flap was harvested (Figure-1) with radial artery and its associated veins.
Preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative anaesthesia and surgical records of elective microvascular tissue transfer with free flap cases between January 2015 and June 2017 were retrospectively reviewed.
Radial forearm free flap offers a plentiful source of thin flexible tissue and long vascular pedicle representing an excellent choice for single stage reconstruction.
In the 1990s, free flap reconstruction was the dominant technique for cancer defect reconstruction.
A review of all published cases of late flap failures in head and neck reconstruction with free flap was conducted using the PubMed MeSH terms "head and neck neoplasms"[MeSH] AND "surgical flaps"[MeSH] AND "postoperative complications"[MeSH]).
It can be considered as a suitable alternative to free flap in suitable cases for its ease of application and flap success.
In a nine-hour intensive surgery, doctors in the UAE removed the tongue of a patient, and replaced it with a forearm free flap.