free exercise


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free exercise

An exercise carried through with no external assistance.
See also: exercise
References in periodicals archive ?
First, RLUIPA is narrower than RFRA; whereas RFRA applied to all free exercise claims, RLUIPA encompasses only those that are brought in the context of religious land use and state institutions.
(52) Significantly, RLUIPA applies even where the burden on free exercise results from a neutral rule of general applicability.
The Constitution and Basic Foundation of Free Exercise
Constitution, which states "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof." (24) The idea of establishing a government without a corresponding state religion was an innovative concept, but one which the Founders were eager to embrace, (25) particularly given that many early settlers to the United States immigrated in order to escape religious persecution and several states were founded on freedom of religion.
The Religion Clauses provide that "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof." (8) One tool for determining the scope of the "free exercise [of religion]" is the term's historical meaning.
(15) These protections took the form of broad, open-ended guarantees of liberty of conscience, freedom of worship, free exercise of religion, or immunity from discrimination on account of creed.
'Hence, my right to the exercise of religious freedom and worship in the Philippines, which also include the free exercise and performance of apostolate and missionary works, are also protected by the Bill of Rights guaranteed under Philippine Constitution,' Sister Fox also said.
'My right to the exercise of religious freedom and worship in the Philippines, which also include the free exercise and performance of the apostolate and missionary works, are also protected by the Bill of Rights guaranteed under Philippine Constitution,' she added.
Although never having addressed this specific issue, I argue that the Supreme Court has established rules for determining whether corporations can invoke particular constitutional rights and that, under these rules, corporations can invoke the protection of the Free Exercise Clause.
Overview of the Free Exercise Issues Implicated by the HHS Mandate B.
Yet, in the end, it is hard to escape the conclusion that from the perspective of free exercise of religion for everyone, including religious minorities, the Japanese Supreme Court decision in Matsumodo v.