fraternise

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fraternise

Sexology
verb To keep intimate company with a person.
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The word to the wise is to implement loophole-free fraternization policies that safeguard employers from legal snafus should workplace relationships go awry.
Concerned about the implications of fraternization, especially Christmas cease-fires, which could have a disproportionate emotional resonance, the British High Command, from St.
Indeed, the problem of sexuality far exceeds the issue of consensual fraternization and its effect on the credibility of women soldiers.
While the best advice for employers continues to be a strict prohibition of fraternization in the workplace, the next best preventive measure may well be to permit a "love contract" exception to the rule.
Underlying this thesis is a straightforward reading of the edicts of expulsion, which proclaim that fraternization between Jews and New Christians made the latter's full integration impossible.
The crime of fraternization is committed when (1) it is against the customs and traditions of the services for an officer to "fraternize on terms of military equality with one or more certain enlisted member(s) in a certain manner" and (2) "such fraternization violated the customs of the accused's service that officers shall not fraternize with enlisted members.
It also strongly discouraged peer fraternization which was defined as prohibiting any romantic relationship and cohabitation.
This, naturally, is not appreciated back at headquarters, fraternization being a big wartime no-no and some of this looked upon as outright treason.
British and American posters warned soldiers of this reason to avoid fraternization, using a variety of devices to promote either abstinence or careful precaution.
The goal of this series was to create a venue that would promote peer fraternization and clearly present relevant and current market information from leading industry professionals.
He pointedly notes that "despite the fact that hundreds of former Iraqi soldiers and officers were detainees, MP personnel were allowed to wear civilian clothes," and that the handful of actions for which more than a dozen officers and senior noncommissioned officers were reprimanded or disciplined for--from lax security enforcement to drinking to fraternization to even, in the case of one captain, "tak[ing] nude pictures of .