frailty

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A state of delicacy or weakness which encompasses age-related fragility, in particular osteoporosis
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

frailty

Vox populi A state of delicacy or weakness which, which encompasses age-related fragility, in particular osteoporosis. See FICSIT, Osteoporosis.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

frailty

Weakness, fragility, lack of balance or endurance, sarcopenia, immobility, and wasting.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Assisted living has to accept and understand the fact that people will become more and more frail. That will continue to be the case."
Asked if a move was likely, Frail said: "If that's agreeable to both parties then it'd be good for him.
Recording a verdict of natural causes, Teesside Coroner Michael Sheffield said Mrs Popple was a very frail old lady with numerous health problems who ultimately succumbed to pneumonia.
The elderly were categorized as non-frail (0 points), pre-frail (1 points), and frail ([greater than or equal to]2 points).
Recognizing the challenges and opportunities to improve care for the frail, Primary Health Care and the Department of Family Practice, Nova Scotia Health Authority (NSHA) in collaboration with the Department of Medicine, and a broad group of community stakeholders began the development of what is now known as the NSHA Frailty Strategy.
"Prehabilitation may be a useful tool to increase physiologic reserve and subsequently improve access to kidney transplantation among frail patients," said Dr.
Another costumer said sacrificial animals were frail but their prices were very high.
'Nearly all older adults can benefit from a regular structured programme of physical activity including those who are frail,' Fielding said by email.
No studies examining the prevalence of UI among frail older adults across care settings were identified.
The concept of "frail patient" is increasingly used in the clinical practice, without referring to an organic lesion, or to a specific diagnosis, but within the integral vision of the patient.