fractionation


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fractionation

 [frak″shun-a´shun]
1. in radiology, division of the total dose of radiation into small doses given at intervals.
2. in chemistry, separation of a substance into components, as by distillation or crystallization.
3. in histology, isolation of components of living cells by differential centrifugation.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

frac·tion·a·tion

(frak'shŭn-ā'shŭn),
1. To separate components of a mixture.
2. The administration of a course of therapeutic radiation of a neoplasm in a planned series of fractions of the total dose, most often once a day for several weeks, in order to minimize radiation damage of contiguous normal tissues.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

fractionation

(frăk′shə-nā′shən)
n.
1. The process of dividing or separating into parts; breaking up.
2. The division of a total therapeutic dose of radiation into small doses to be administered over a period of days or weeks.
3. The separation of a chemical compound into components, as by distillation.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

fractionation

Radiation oncology The parceling of a dose of radiation over time. See Accelerated fractionation, Hyperfractionation, Radiation therpy.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

frac·tion·a·tion

(frakshŭn-āshŭn)
1. Separation of the components of a mixture into its basic constituents.
2. The administration of a course of therapeutic radiation in a planned series of fractions of the total dose, most often once a day for several weeks, to minimize radiation damage of contiguous normal tissues.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Fractionation

A laboratory test or process in which blood or another fluid is broken down into its components. Fractionation can be used to assess the proportions of the different types of cholesterol in a blood sample.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

frac·tion·a·tion

(frakshŭn-āshŭn)
1. Separation of the components of a mixture into its basic constituents.
2. The administration of a course of therapeutic radiation of a neoplasm in a planned series of fractions of the total dose, most often once a day for several weeks, to minimize radiation damage.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The House Report on the Act focuses on the "stronger measures" being placed upon intestate succession that will serve to "slow and halt" continued fractionation, Id.
Therefore, this experimental subplot offers a good opportunity to study the effect of litter inputs on [sup.15]N fractionation.
The [[delta].sup.13]C fractionation between phytoplankton and zooplankton was highly variable between the sampling stations and values were considered in module.
The plant got the ranking after it was expanded with a fourth fractionation unit as part of the Hawiyah NGL Project.
You have a very high starch content germ from the dry fractionation and that lowers the oil content.
Nitrogen isotope ratios become enriched at successive trophic levels, thereby allowing estimates of the consumer's trophic position (the fractionation value is 3.4 [per thousand]; Minagawa & Wada 1984).
"Fractionation is the key to unlocking the full potential of corn-based ethanol production.
The key sub-processes in the recycled fiber lines include OptiSlush[TM] pulping, detrashing, cleaning, OptiScreen[TM] coarse screening, LC cleaning, fractionation and fine screening, thickening, OptiFiner[TM] dispersion and engineering services.
Broin said it received matching grant funds from the Department of Energy (DOE) for the development of BFrac, which was codeveloped with milling grain fractionation company Satake.
Timescales for differentiation (mostly crystal fractionation) are generally less than a few thousand years.
Multiple, rapidly evolving fractionation, chemical tagging, mass spectrometry, microarray format affinity methods, and database search algorithms are highlighted; key challenges are much higher throughput, validation of protein identifications, and quantitation.