Fox

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Fox

(foks),
George H., U.S. dermatologist, 1846-1937. See: Fox-Fordyce disease.

Fox

(foks),
Lewis, 20th-century U.S. periodontist. See: Goldman-Fox knives.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Prudhoe Bay Oilfield is home to sympatric populations of red and arctic foxes. Both species are known to occur year-round and to breed successfully within the oilfield, but studies to date have concentrated mainly on the arctic fox and its relationship to petroleum development activities (e.g., Eberhardt, 1977; Fine, 1980; Garrott, 1980; Eberhardt et al., 1982, 1983).
Those foxes too old, weak, infirm or diseased to hunt food simply did not make it.
city dwellers, foxes mate noisily, leave smelly droppings, dig up flower bulbs, rifle through trash and occasionally attack pets or people.
In more arid climes, the much smaller swift and kit foxes prevail, although red foxes are increasing their range and often kill swift and kit foxes should their paths ever cross.
As councillors we've been notified by scores of residents of various cases of urban foxes encroaching into people's gardens and causing a particular nuisance, especially in relation to foraging in bins and refuse.
There is limited information about when the contraction began in different regions, although MacPherson (1964) reported red foxes on Baffin Island in Canada in 1918.
Most foxes were obtained as carcasses found on roads, but a few were shot or poisoned by the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish.
The cross phase is common in Europe and is often seen in North American foxes, probably because European foxes were introduced to North America some time in the 1700s for hunting purposes.
Dogs are more likely to hurt babies than foxes. And horrible human beings do more harm to children than dogs.
A SCOTS pest control expert yesterday urged parents not to panic over the risk posed by foxes after a newborn baby was bitten in an attack.