squirrel

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Related to fox squirrel: black squirrel

squirrel

small, arboreal, mostly herbivorous rodents varying in color from gray to shiny black, red and cream, and in size from mouse to large cat. Some are insectivorous, and many are terrestrial, e.g. the chipmunks. Some glide although they are called flying squirrels. Most squirrels are diurnal but the flying genera are nocturnal. They are all members of the family Sciuridae, which includes a very large number of species, and are distinguished by their fine, dense fur and their bushy, plume-like tails and ears that are often surmounted by tufts of hair.

squirrel corn
dicentracanadensis.
squirrel fibroma
a poxvirus disease caused by a member of the genus Leporipoxvirus in which there are typical subcutaneous fibroma lesions. The virus isolated from the lesions has been used to produce fibroma lesions in rabbits.
fox squirrel
this species has a characteristic of inherited porphyria manifested by fluorescence of bones and teeth when viewed under ultraviolet light, and a pink coloration of these and other tissues. There is no photosensitization. Called also Sciurus spp.
squirrel monkey
a dramatically colored, e.g. yellow-green with red lower limbs, squirrel-sized, carnivorous monkey distinguished by its large brain. Called also Saimiri sciureus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Distribution of the Eastern Fox Squirrel (Sciurus niger) in the greater Los Angeles metropolitan area as of 2014.
Energy metabolism and body composition of the fox squirrel.
The impetus for the present study was provided by a recent mammalogy laboratory exercise conducted by the third author, which unexpectedly demonstrated that a large proportion of fox squirrel skulls did not fluoresce when exposed to ultraviolet light.
Food availability could be a factor in the replacement of gray squirrels from habitats invaded by the fox squirrel.
Before the late 1970s most fox squirrel research involved a western subspecies (Sciurus niger rufiventer) and little information existed about the southeastern fox squirrel group.
Salt preferences and sodium drive phenology in fox squirrels and woodchucks.
It is one of two tree squirrels in the Los Angeles area, the other being the eastern fox squirrel (Sciurus niger), a non-native introduced in the early 1900s, and now abundant throughout much of the Los Angeles area of southern California (Jameson and Peeters 1988, King et al.
In California, exotic species such as the eastern fox squirrel may be well suited to take advantage of disturbed conditions and consequently invade areas that previously were inhabited by the western gray squirrel prior to development (Byrne, 1979; Korschgen, 1981; Shepherd and Swihart, 1995; Steele and Koprowski, 2001; Salmon et al.
The eastern fox squirrel, Sciurus niger--hereafter EFS, is native to the eastern and central United States and the southern prairie provinces of Canada, south of approximately 48'N latitude (Koprowski 1994) where they are known to live in forests, woodlands, agricultural landscapes and urban areas (Kleiman et al.
Similar reduction of antipredator defenses were documented among fox squirrels (Sciurus niger) living in urbanized areas (McCleery, 1990).
While Trujillo was breaking him from chasing anything but squirrels, Poncho treed 40 gray squirrels and one fox squirrel for the gun.