foveation

foveation

 [fo″ve-a´shun]
formation of pits on a surface, as on the skin; a pitted condition.

fo·ve·a·tion

(fō'vē-ā'shŭn),
Pitted scar formation, as in smallpox, chickenpox, or vaccinia.
[L. fovea, a pit]

foveation

Formation of pits on the skin or other surface; in practice, foveation is little used in the working medical parlance, and the plain English “pitting” is widely preferred.

fo·ve·a·tion

(fō-vē-ā'shŭn)
Pitted scar formation, as in chickenpox.
[L. fovea, a pit]
References in periodicals archive ?
Foveation in visual systems refers to the capability to process just the information at the center of focus in high detail.
Another new XR technology innovation is Adreno Foveation, which combines graphics rendering with eye tracking to understand where the user is looking.
Another innovation here is the inclusion of Adreno Foveation, which combines graphics rendering and eye tracking.
In addition, Qualcomm Snapdragon 845 is also 30 percent more efficient than the 835 thanks to 'Adreno foveation,' which substantially reduces power consumption, improves visual quality and boosts XR application performance.
The tenotomy procedure, which involves severing the horizontal recti at the muscle insertion followed by reattachment at the original site, is thought to modify the proprioceptive loop in the extraocular muscles, resulting in broadening of the null zone and improvement in the nystagmus waveform and foveation duration.
Itti, "Automatic foveation for video compression using a neurobiological model of visual attention," IEEE Transactions on Image Processing, vol.
With that purpose, an active vision paradigm is used: the behaviour-dependent processing of visual data for attentive visual scrutiny based on shifting the fixation point of different targets (active foveation).
Rephrased in New Historicist terminology, the rhetorical analysis of the anecdote enables insight into its foveation, its "ability to keep an object within the high-resolution area of perception" (10) (Greenblatt 34).
In contrast, detection rates following target foveation were poorer in older adults than in younger adults, F(1, 26) = 94.465, p < .001, and were degraded under dual-task conditions, F(1,26) = 12.503, p = .002.
Humans have a visual mechanism, called foveation, that moves the head and eyes so that information of potential interest will fall on the cell-dense region of the fovea, and thus activate more cells in the cortex.