foveal vision


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foveal vision

Perception of objects whose images fall on the FOVEA centralis-the most discriminating part of the RETINA. Also known as photopic vision.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Post hoc comparisons showed that participants using parafoveal vision had the fastest reaction time, 626[+ or -]8ms, compared with foveal vision 661[+ or -]10ms and peripheral vision 661[+ or -]9ms.
Not surprisingly, individuals with unimpaired foveal vision use their fovea to scan text and fixate individual objects.
Because foveal vision is of minor importance when it comes to perceived SO, this part of the visual field can be left out.
This would imply that the beginning of the word in the right visual field could fall in foveal vision (whereas its end would be in the parafovea); in contrast, the opposite would apply to the word in the left visual field.
The key benefits of foveal vision are its simultaneous wide FOV, high resolution, high frame rates, low bandwidth (obtained through context sensitive data gathering) and quick response time.
Patients with GA and foveal-sparing scotomas have a keen need for increased lighting and good contrast (Sunness et al., 2008) so as to maximize their foveal vision, and this may be the most important intervention for these patients.
The functional visual field is affected by the workload placed on foveal vision, the level of concentration, the familiarity with and context of the peripheral stimulus, and environmental stress.
The most frequent of these diseases is age-related macular degeneration (AMD), in which foveal vision is often impaired by a central scotoma that impairs vision of fine detail and causes problems with reading and recognizing faces.
ABCs of foveal vision. Optical Engineering, 40, 2735-2745.
When foveal vision is lost because of macula or optic nerve disease and a person looks "beyond" the object of regard to place the image on a viable area of the peripheral retina, it is considered eccentric viewing (Duke-Elder & Wybar, 1973; von Noorden, 1990).
Over a small portion of this range (approximately 3 log units), however, small changes in luminance are associated with large decrements in foveal vision. As shown in Figure 1, foveal acuity and contrast sensitivity, which are essential for object recognition, degrade rapidly during civil twilight.
To some extent, the latter is the result of an increasing reliance in feedback design on foveal vision -- an approach that fails to support pilots in tracking system-induced changes and events in parallel with performing concurrent flight-related tasks.