foster care


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foster care

The care of individuals who cannot live independently (such as children, homeless families, or frail elderly people) in a group or private home.
See also: care
References in periodicals archive ?
"As you can imagine, teen pregnancy in foster care puts the teen and the baby at a high risk in a number of ways, including a high risk of the baby being removed by CPS and placed in foster care," Kate Murphy, senior child welfare policy associate at Texans Care for Children, said in a statement.
Although the AAP has developed guidelines for such comprehensive healthcare of children in foster care, implementation is difficult because of rapid situational changes and the overlapping lines of authority between parents, child welfare workers, private foster care agencies and the courts.7 Additional barriers to care include lack of health information, issues with consent, confidentiality and communication, insufficient funding, poor or absent care coordination and long waiting lists for community-based medical and mental health services.1
Adoptive and foster care families must cope with the normal challenges that accompany transitioning to parenthood (e.g., changes in mental health, physical health, and relationship functioning; McKay et al., 2010), as well as unique challenges often associated with foster care and adoption (e.g., experiences with infertility, parenting a child from a different racial/ethnic background, and parenting a child with emotional or behavioral problems; McKay & Ross, 2010).
"Foster carers also receive lots of peer support from other carers, and we hold events specifically to celebrate our foster carers and the children they care for and to bring them together, including family fun days and foster care awards.
The state, desperate to maintain its shrinking number of foster care providers, sometimes compromises standards for certification or licensing.
In general, abuse, neglect, and abandonment are the most frequent reasons why children enter the foster care system (Andersson, 2009; Bolen, McWey, & Schlee, 2008; Bruskas, 2008; Children's Bureau, 2014, Vanderploeg, Connell, Caron, Saunders, Katz, & Tebes, 2007; Whiting & Lee, 2003).
increases in foster care and parental drug use," lead researcher Angelica Meinhofer, who is an instructor of health care policy and research at Weill Cornell Medical College, (https://edition.cnn.com/2019/07/15/health/foster-care-drug-use-study/index.html) said.
From 2012 to 2017, kids living in foster care increased by 12%, and children entering foster care increased by 8%.
A total of 4,972,911 foster care entries were identified, of which 23.38 percent were home removals attributable to parental drug use.
Although, nationally, drug overdose hospitalizations and drug overdose deaths are related to increased child welfare caseloads and people on the frontlines (judges, caseworkers) describe a sharp increase in foster care placements due to opioids, we do not have solid data that demonstrates it.
are disproportionately represented in foster care, according to a new study.

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