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fork

 [fork]
a pronged instrument.
tuning fork a device that produces harmonic vibration when its two prongs are struck; used to test hearing and bone conduction. See tuning fork tests.

fork

(fōrk),
1. A pronged instrument used for holding or lifting.
2. An instrument resembling a fork in that it has tines or prongs.

fork

(fork) a pronged instrument.
replication fork  a site on a DNA molecule at which unwinding of the helices and synthesis of daughter molecules are both occurring.
Enlarge picture
Replication fork, showing simultaneous synthesis of both strands; since synthesis occurs in the 5′ to 3′ direction, one strand, the leading strand, can be synthesized continuously while the other, the lagging strand, must be synthesized discontinuously in short fragments (Okazaki fragments) which are later joined.
tuning fork  a device that produces harmonic vibration when its two prongs are struck; used to test hearing and bone conduction.

fork

[fôrk]
Etymology: L, furca
1 an instrument with prongs.
2 something resembling such an instrument.

fork

(fōrk)
A pronged instrument used for holding or lifting.

fork

(fōrk)
1. A pronged instrument used for holding or lifting.
2. An instrument resembling a fork in that it has tines or prongs.
References in classic literature ?
Now you might as well be good, old man," Mulcachy addressed him in soft, caressing tones, taking a step toward him and holding in advance the iron fork.
If you doubt the penitence as a practical fact, there are your knives and forks.
After suffering extremely from hunger, they arrived at Laramie's Fork, a small tributary of the north branch of the Nebraska, about sixty miles above the cliffs just mentioned.
Since they were in pairs, and the other of the Fork was mad and sang foolishly, we waited for some heathen to do what was needful.
My friend," said the small priest, laying down his knife and fork in a kind of cold despair, "I doubt everything.
Tess could not get on with her digging after this; she felt restless; she wondered if he had gone back to her father's house; and taking the fork in her hand proceeded homewards.
Augusta," he said, turning pale and laying down his fork, "have you any other reason for thinking that Bencomb is less to be relied on than he was?
I would gladly have eaten the potatoes and let the meat alone, but having got a large piece of the latter on to my plate, I could not be so impolite as to leave it; so, after many awkward and unsuccessful attempts to cut it with the knife, or tear it with the fork, or pull it asunder between them, sensible that the awful lady was a spectator to the whole transaction, I at last desperately grasped the knife and fork in my fists, like a child of two years old, and fell to work with all the little strength I possessed.
In his haste and abstraction he stuck a pickle-fork into his right eye, and on removing the fork the eye came with it.
The face of the young man contracted into a frown: he sat silent, with his fork in his hand, playing absently with the fragments on his plate.
First she gathered it together, stuck the fork into it, then with a rapid, supple movement leaned the whole weight of her body on it, and at once with a bend of her back under the red belt she drew herself up, and arching her full bosom under the white smock, with a smart turn swung the fork in her arms, and flung the bundle of hay high onto the cart.
A knife became suggestive of a fork; and Miss Landless's brother had thrown a fork at Mr.