fork

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fork

 [fork]
a pronged instrument.
tuning fork a device that produces harmonic vibration when its two prongs are struck; used to test hearing and bone conduction. See tuning fork tests.

fork

(fōrk),
1. A pronged instrument used for holding or lifting.
2. An instrument resembling a fork in that it has tines or prongs.

fork

(fōrk)
A pronged instrument used for holding or lifting.

fork

(fōrk)
1. A pronged instrument used for holding or lifting.
2. An instrument resembling a fork in that it has tines or prongs.
References in periodicals archive ?
oA( Although this is the case, some pupils 24% in our survey) liked plastic forks as hey were lightweight and easy to take 2 th around when you have a takeaway meal.
The equipment consisted of a Model 400 vibratory bowl feeder (having capacity of 30 kgs), a motorized belt conveyor on which the vision camera was mounted, sorting mechanism and stacking forks mounted on an indexing table.
There is a fork at the bridgehead, and visitors should take the right-hand fork that goes under the bridge.
In addition to Fork Shield, the manufacturer recently announced Fork Wear Indicator, an easy to read guide stamped into the side of select Arrow ITA forks.
Forks for gathering and pitching hay and grain have been around since antiquity and originally were made of wood with the handle and two or three tines carved from a stout sapling with the branches located just right.
Dakota Access, LLC and Energy Transfer Crude Oil Company (ETCO) plan a binding supplemental open season to solicit shipper commitments for transportation service for Bakken/Three Forks production to reach multiple markets through their respective pipeline systems--collectively, the Bakken Pipeline.
If tp(a/C) implies a disjunction of formulas, each of which stably divides (w.p.) over A we say tp(a/C) stably forks (w.p.) over A.
Place the three forks where you want them positioned on your piece of wood.
Economy models for occasional use have a 4,500-pound capacity and 48-inch forks. For more frequent use, standard and heavy-duty models have 5,000- and 5,500-pound capacities, 20.5 or 27-inch wide configurations, and fork lengths from 32 to 72 inches.
Two sets of forks were used to tinker with bite size: a larger fork that held 20 percent more food than the fork usually used in the restaurant, and a smaller fork that held 20 percent less than the usual utensil.
They used two sizes of forks to manipulate bite sizes and found that diners who used large forks ate less than those with small forks.
The first table fork to appear in Europe seems to have arrived in Italy in the fourteenth century with a princess from Byzantium, where table forks had been used since at least the seventh century (Flandrin, Montanari, and Sonnenfeld 1999; Giblin 1987).