foreskin


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foreskin

 [for´skin]
a loose fold of skin that covers the glans penis; it is a continuation of the loose skin that covers the entire penis and scrotum. Its removal is called circumcision. Called also prepuce.
Patient Care. In the uncircumcised male the foreskin is retracted at least daily and the glans penis washed with soap and water. In the newborn, assessment includes inspecting the foreskin and underlying penis for evidence of adhesions, interference with urination or other abnormalities. Before discharge the parents are taught how to clean the genitals of an uncircumcised male infant.
Foreskin. From Lammon et al., 1995.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

pre·puce

(prē'pūs), [TA]
A free fold of skin that covers the glans penis or clitoris.
Synonym(s): preputium [TA], foreskin
[L. praeputium, foreskin]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

foreskin

(fôr′skĭn′)
n.
The loose fold of skin that covers the glans of the penis. Also called prepuce.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
The fleshy mucocutaneous tissue that covers an uncircumcised penis
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

foreskin

Urology Prepuce; the fleshy mucocutaneous tissue that covers an uncircumcised penis. See Circumcision, Penis.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

pre·puce

(prē'pyūs) [TA]
The free fold of skin that covers the glans penis more or less completely.
Synonym(s): preputium [TA] , foreskin.
[L. praeputium, foreskin]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

foreskin

The prepuce or hood of thin skin that covers the bulb (glans) of the penis. Surgical removal of the foreskin is called CIRCUMCISION and this is widely practised, usually for ritual or cultural reasons. The medical indications for circumcision are few.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

foreskin

see PREPUCE.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Foreskin

A covering fold of skin over the tip of the penis.
Mentioned in: Circumcision
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In modern history, it is less likely for one's foreskin status to be a cause for religious or political persecution.
To measure these changes, the researchers enlisted 156 uncircumcised, married men in Uganda and obtained swabs from under each man's foreskin. Roughly half of the men were then randomly assigned to get circumcised.
If there is any abnormality whatsoever to the foreskin or penis, a urologist should be consulted to examine the infant before newborn circumcision is contemplated.
We investigated a cohort of mainly Xhosa men to determine the proportion who had undergone TC, the extent of foreskin removal, and attitudes towards MC as an HIV prevention tool, for themselves and their sons.
Its second issue features an anti-Semitic story in which Foreskin Man attempts to stop a "Monster Mohel" from performing a circumcision during a Brit Mila ceremony.
Try stretching the foreskin by applying a little moisturiser after you've had a shower or bath and gently pull it back.
Siffredi, who calls his decision "catastrophic," says that with a foreskin, "you can feel much more fun."
They gamely gathered all available stars by downing concoctions such as Foreskin and Tonic - pulped crocodile foreskin - and Bumand Coke - pulped kangaroo anus.
In adults, a tight foreskin can sometimes make sex painful and again circumcision might be offered as a solution.
Q MY boyfriend is 20 but has just been told he needs to be circumcised as he is having problems with his foreskin being tight.
Clinical trials in Uganda and Kenya have confirmed South African research into the protective benefits of having the foreskin removed.