forepaw

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forepaw

(fôr′pô′)
n.
The paw of an animal's foreleg.
References in periodicals archive ?
Normal mice grasped the wire with forepaws, and when allowed to hang free, they placed at least one hind foot on the wire within 5 seconds.
On the other hand, the asymmetrical styles exhibited a period of support in which only the forepaws were seen grabbing the mesh.
Impaired contralateral paw movement (contralateral bias) was determined based on the number of contralateral versus ipsilateral adjusting steps of the forepaws. A significant difference in the contralateral bias during forced sidestepping was found in only one case.
Foraging porcupines of the genus Hystrix dig soil with their nailed forepaws, resulting into elliptical digs that are narrow and deep at the anterior end, and wider and shallow posteriorly.
Another approach involved a bear that stood on its hind limbs, placed its forepaws on the drifting vessel's hull, and sniffed the air while garbage burned onboard, an apparent response to olfactory cues.
Hind and forepaws from six to ten animals per group from one representative experiment of two performed.
This test involves the forepaws of the mice being placed on a horizontally suspended wire (measuring 2 mm in diameter and 1 m in length), placed one meter above a soft bedding-filled landing area.
The latency was recorded from the moment the mice were placed in the cage to the moment they grasped the food pellet with the forepaws or teeth.
He could double or triple a body part, for example, adding extra faces on the torso (116, 168, 192, 206), give a demon only four fingers or a hoof (192, 196, 197, 202), insert a tail between threatening, upward-reaching forepaws or a head between legs (200), or arm a warrior demon with a head for a shield (210).
Because of their webbed forepaws, polar bears are extremely strong swimmers--they can swim up to 60 miles without rest and dive
Twice did the dog, all bloody and mutilated, escape from his implacable knife; and twice did I see him put his forepaws around Magendie's neck and lick his face.
Each mouse was individually placed on the hot plate in order to find the animal's reaction to electrical heat-induced pain (licking of the forepaws and eventually jumping).