forensic nursing


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Related to forensic nursing: Forensic science

forensic nursing

a nursing specialty involving provision of care to victims of crime, such as sexual and other types of assaults, as well as collecting evidence, performing certain types of death investigations, and working with prison inmates.

forensic nursing

(1) The application of the nursing process to public or legal proceedings.

(2) The application of forensic aspects of healthcare combined with the biopsychosocial education of a registered nurse to the scientific investigation of trauma, and/or death related to medicolegal issues—e.g., violence, criminal activity—and traumatic accidents.

forensic nursing

The application of forensic aspects of health care combined with the biopsychosocial education of the registered nurse in investigation and treatment of trauma, and death of victims and perpetrators of violence, criminal activity, and traumatic accidents within the clinical or community institution. See Sexual assault nurse examiner.

forensic nursing

A subspecialty of nursing requiring formal preparation (a master's or other postgraduate degree) in which nurses conduct sexual assault examinations and participate in a wide variety of other legal matters affecting health care.
See also: nursing
References in periodicals archive ?
The most widely recognized role in forensic nursing practice continues to be that of the Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE), although many nurse examiner programs are expanding their services to provide holistic care and evidentiary exams for patients impacted by domestic violence, child abuse, elder abuse and human trafficking.
The JHUSON forensic nursing options currently include MSN, DNP, and PhD degrees in addition to the new CAFN.
Knight, "The Real CSI: Forensic Nursing in the ED," Nursing Spectrum, September 20, 2004; retrieved on May 11, 2005, from http://www.
There are only five hospitals in the country with forensic nurse examiners on staff, and the Hastings hospital is paving the way for other forensic nursing positions, Weiler said.
According to Forensic Nursing Scope and Standards of Practice, the Forensic nurses address the healthcare needs of vulnerable and often disadvantaged patient populations which include children, individuals with congenital and developmental handicaps, residents of nursing homes, psychiatric patients, and individuals who are addicted, homeless or incarcerated.
In addition to online classes, forensic nursing students will gain firsthand forensic experience as they complete the clinical components of their degree.
UTHSC College of Nursing currently offers the following DNP specialties: Acute and Critical Care, Primary Care, Forensic Nursing, Psychiatric/Family Nurse Practitioner, Neonatal Nurse Practitioner, and Public Health.
The fourth edition adds chapters on disaster preparation and forensic nursing.
Investments in 2006 saw the opening of new multi-disciplinary branches in Preston and Runcorn in north west England, as well as establishing a new Forensic Nursing Division through the acquisition of Link, a specialist nursing and healthcare agency serving Wales and the West.
We just didn't call it that until the 1990's when Virginia Lynch and others started defining forensic nursing and its role.
Goldstein, The SART/SANE Orientation Guide, 1997 (Santa Cruz, CA: Forensic Nursing Services) and Sherry Arndt, interview by author, July 2001.

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