forensic nursing


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Related to forensic nursing: Forensic science

forensic nursing

(1) The application of the nursing process to public or legal proceedings.

(2) The application of forensic aspects of healthcare combined with the biopsychosocial education of a registered nurse to the scientific investigation of trauma, and/or death related to medicolegal issues—e.g., violence, criminal activity—and traumatic accidents.

forensic nursing

The application of forensic aspects of health care combined with the biopsychosocial education of the registered nurse in investigation and treatment of trauma, and death of victims and perpetrators of violence, criminal activity, and traumatic accidents within the clinical or community institution. See Sexual assault nurse examiner.

forensic nursing

A subspecialty of nursing requiring formal preparation (a master's or other postgraduate degree) in which nurses conduct sexual assault examinations and participate in a wide variety of other legal matters affecting health care.
See also: nursing
References in periodicals archive ?
"They have trauma in their past, and so Alaska CARES is really working to have early intervention with young people and put them on a better path in hopes that we don't have to serve them in forensic nursing later on,"
[33.] Forensic Nursing. http://www.iafn.org (Erisim tarihi: 15.06.2011).
The most widely recognized role in forensic nursing practice continues to be that of the Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE), although many nurse examiner programs are expanding their services to provide holistic care and evidentiary exams for patients impacted by domestic violence, child abuse, elder abuse and human trafficking.
Knight, "The Real CSI: Forensic Nursing in the ED," Nursing Spectrum, September 20, 2004; retrieved on May 11, 2005, from http://www.community.nursingspectrum.com/MagazineArticles/article.cfm?AID=12758.
Weiler received a certificate in forensic science from Southeast Community College in Lincoln and a certificate in forensic nursing.
According to Forensic Nursing Scope and Standards of Practice, the Forensic nurses address the healthcare needs of vulnerable and often disadvantaged patient populations which include children, individuals with congenital and developmental handicaps, residents of nursing homes, psychiatric patients, and individuals who are addicted, homeless or incarcerated.
Forensic nurses preparing professional portfolios for the forensic nursing specialty certification process may wish to review the draft Forensic Nursing: Scope and Standards document that has now moved into the publishing process.
2) Collaborate with the Oklahoma Chapters of the following nursing organizations such as the American Academy of Nursing Violence Panel, Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN), The Emergency Nurses Association (ENA), Nurse Midwives, National Forensic Nursing Institute and other stakeholders to publish, publicize, and disseminate consistent and evidence based IPV clinical practice guidelines
Fitchburg State College is one of only a few campuses to offer a master's degree in forensic nursing. Starting this fall, it will be the only college in the country to offer the program online.
UTHSC College of Nursing currently offers the following DNP specialties: Acute and Critical Care, Primary Care, Forensic Nursing, Psychiatric/Family Nurse Practitioner, Neonatal Nurse Practitioner, and Public Health.
Kathy Crisler did a presentation on "The Role of Nursing In China." Mary Pat DeWald presented on forensic nursing. These quality presentations were supported by the efforts of DNA 20 members.
The fourth edition adds chapters on disaster preparation and forensic nursing.

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