forensic medicine


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medicine

 [med´ĭ-sin]
1. any drug or remedy.
2. the art and science of the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.
3. the nonsurgical treatment of disease.
alternative medicine see complementary and alternative medicine.
aviation medicine the branch of medicine that deals with the physiologic, medical, psychologic, and epidemiologic problems involved in flying.
ayurvedic medicine the traditional medicine of India, done according to Hindu scriptures and making use of plants and other healing materials native to India.
behavioral medicine a type of psychosomatic medicine focused on psychological means of influencing physical symptoms, such as biofeedback or relaxation.
clinical medicine
1. the study of disease by direct examination of the living patient.
2. the last two years of the usual curriculum in a medical college.
complementary medicine (complementary and alternative medicine (CAM)) a large and diverse set of systems of diagnosis, treatment, and prevention based on philosophies and techniques other than those used in conventional Western medicine, often derived from traditions of medical practice used in other, non-Western cultures. Such practices may be described as alternative, that is, existing as a body separate from and as a replacement for conventional Western medicine, or complementary, that is, used in addition to conventional Western practice. CAM is characterized by its focus on the whole person as a unique individual, on the energy of the body and its influence on health and disease, on the healing power of nature and the mobilization of the body's own resources to heal itself, and on the treatment of the underlying causes, rather than symptoms, of disease. Many of the techniques used are the subject of controversy and have not been validated by controlled studies.
emergency medicine the medical specialty that deals with the acutely ill or injured who require immediate medical treatment. See also emergency and emergency care.
experimental medicine study of the science of healing diseases based on experimentation in animals.
family medicine family practice.
forensic medicine the application of medical knowledge to questions of law; see also medical jurisprudence. Called also legal medicine.
group medicine the practice of medicine by a group of physicians, usually representing various specialties, who are associated together for the cooperative diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease.
internal medicine the medical specialty that deals with diagnosis and medical treatment of diseases and disorders of internal structures of the body.
legal medicine forensic medicine.
nuclear medicine the branch of medicine concerned with the use of radionuclides in diagnosis and treatment of disease.
patent medicine a drug or remedy protected by a trademark, available without a prescription.
physical medicine physiatry.
preclinical medicine the subjects studied in medicine before the student observes actual diseases in patients.
preventive medicine the branch of medical study and practice aimed at preventing disease and promoting health.
proprietary medicine any chemical, drug, or similar preparation used in the treatment of diseases, if such article is protected against free competition as to name, product, composition, or process of manufacture by secrecy, patent, trademark, or copyright, or by other means.
psychosomatic medicine the study of the interrelations between bodily processes and emotional life.
socialized medicine a system of medical care regulated and controlled by the government; called also state medicine.
space medicine the branch of aviation medicine concerned with conditions encountered by human beings in space.
sports medicine the field of medicine concerned with injuries sustained in athletic endeavors, including their prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.
state medicine socialized medicine.
travel medicine (travelers' medicine) the subspecialty of tropical medicine consisting of the diagnosis and treatment or prevention of diseases of travelers.
tropical medicine medical science as applied to diseases occurring primarily in the tropics and subtropics.
veterinary medicine the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of animals other than humans.

fo·ren·sic med·i·cine

1. the relation and application of medical facts to legal matters;
2. the law in its bearing on the practice of medicine.

forensic medicine

n.
The branch of medicine that interprets or establishes the facts in civil or criminal law cases. Also called medical jurisprudence.

forensic medicine

Etymology: L, forum, public place, medicinus, physician
a branch of medicine that deals with the legal aspects of health care (e.g., autopsies, investigation and determination of time and cause of death).

fo·ren·sic med·i·cine

(fŏr-en'sik med'i-sin)
1. The relation and application of medical facts to legal matters.
2. The law in its bearing on the practice of medicine.
Synonym(s): legal medicine.

forensic medicine

The application of medical science in the investigation of crime. Forensic scientists are familiar with disease processes (pathology), with the signs of assault, including rape, with some aspects of dentistry, with the action of poisons (toxicology), with the effects of firearms and other offensive weapons and with the principles of determining the time of death. They are concerned with human identification by DNA analysis, and with the evidential significance of skin scrapings, hair, seminal fluid, blood, natural and synthetic fibres, paint chips, dust, soil and many other materials. Forensic medicine is also known as medical jurisprudence or legal medicine.

fo·ren·sic med·i·cine

(fŏr-en'sik med'i-sin)
1. Application of medical facts to legal matters.
2. Law in its bearing on the practice of medicine.
Synonym(s): medical jurisprudence.
References in periodicals archive ?
1] Department of Forensic Medicine, Ondokuz Mayis University Faculty of Medicine, Samsun, Turkey
In all other countries in which autopsies are conducted in only deaths that are unnatural or due to violence, the nomenclature of forensic medicine holds true.
Over 500 medical students and doctors from Bahrain and the GCC member states are attending the event which focuses on key issues including forensic medicine, sexual violence and child exploitation.
The autopsy was performed at the Institute of Forensic Medicine of Al-Quds University in Jerusalem.
While the forensic medicine report affirmed a story about a car accident, el-Guindi's mother, friends and members of the Popular Current of which he was member turned it into a public opinion case.
Although clinical forensic medicine is practiced de facto in Canada, it is neither recognized as a specialty nor taught at the undergraduate or postgraduate level.
With the death of Professor Lionel Shelsley (LS) Smith, we have lost an early icon of forensic medicine and pathology in South Africa.
Material for this study includes inferences of forensic medicine committee (FMC) examinations regarding professional infringements of medical workers.
The body was sent to the forensic medicine department, while the wounded gunman was taken to a hospital," he added.
The practice of clinical forensic medicine cannot be separated from the protection, promotion and fulfillment of human rights.
Despite criminal reports of the Gendarmery, the Security Department and the Forensic Medicine Institute, the office said there was no evidence that the signature was Colonel Dursun Cicek's.
The Department of Forensic Medicine at the Royal College of Surgeons also found that 63 per cent of gun deaths between 2001 and 2005 happened in Dublin.

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