foremilk


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foremilk

 [for´milk]
1. the first milk to be drawn out during breastfeeding.

co·los·trum

(kō-los'trŭm),
A thin white opalescent fluid, the first milk secreted at the termination of pregnancy; it differs from the milk secreted later by containing more lactalbumin and lactoprotein; colostrum is also rich in antibodies that confer passive immunity to the newborn.
Synonym(s): foremilk
[L.]

foremilk

(fôr′mĭlk′)
n.

co·los·trum

(kŏ-los'trŭm)
A thin white opalescent fluid, the first milk secreted at the termination of pregnancy; it differs from the milk secreted later by containing more lactalbumin and lactoprotein; colostrum is also rich in antibodies which confer passive immunity to the newborn.
Synonym(s): foremilk.
[L.]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Recovery of 44 and 27 isolates, respectively in cows and buffaloes was common to both streak canal swab and quarter foremilk samples (contemporaneous association).
Collection of samples: Streak canal swab (using Calgiswab type 4, Spectrum Lab., Los Angles, USA) and quarter foremilk samples were taken from 20 lactating buffaloes and 20 lactating cows as per the techniques previously described (Hogan et al., 1990; National Mastitis Council, 1990; Muhammad, 1992; Quirk et al., 2012).
TABLE I PULSE FIELD GEL ELECTROPHORESIS (PFGE) CONDITIONS 1st run 2nd run voltage 5 V/cm 6 V/cm initial switching time 0.1 sec 9.0 sec final switching time 11.0 sec 40.0 sec duration 8 h 17h TABLE II RESULTS OF THE BACTERIOLOGICAL EXAMINATIONS OF QUARTER FOREMILK SAMPLES IN QUARTERS, COWS AND HERDS Pathogen bacteria Quarter Cow Herd prevalence prevalence prevalence CNS 464 (15.4%) 295 (15.4%) 33 (100%) Corynebact.
It starts out as foremilk, full of water and lactose, and transforms into hindmilk, which includes fat and calories.
The study treated bottle milk and the foremilk in breast-fed babies with an enzyme called lactase and this resulted in a significant decrease in colic in half the babies tested.
Several days after birth when the mother's milk "comes in," it is balanced so that the infant first receives the thin, watery foremilk to satisfy thirst, and the rich, high-caloric hindmilk, toward the end of the feeding, to satisfy hunger.
It is necessary at first to remove foremilk. Then 2 ml of milk from each quarter must be collected properly on the four corresponding receiving wells.
The highest SCC ([greater than or equal to] 10 million/ml) in foremilk samples were associated with intramammary infections by Arcanobacterium pyogenes (95.5%), Streptococcus agalactiae (57.6%) and Gram-negative organisms (46.5%).
Cue typing in 'green poo' to Google and discovering from a paediatrician in the US that it's probably nothing to worry about, from a United Kingdom website it could be caused by too much foremilk and from somewhere else on the internet ether that as long as Otis is well hydrated and happy there's nothing really that can be done.
Removing a few streams of mi from each teat prior to preparing for milking is known as "foremilk stripping" or simply "stripping the udder." Foremilk contains relatively higher numbers of bacteria and white blood cells, or somatic cells, which fight infections that cause mastitis--an in flammation of the m a m m a r y gland.