forefoot


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Related to forefoot: forefoot valgus, forefoot varus

forefoot

 [for´foot]
the front part of the foot.

forefoot

(fôr′fo͝ot′)
n.
Either of the front feet of a quadruped.

fore·foot

(fōr'fut)
The part of the foot containing the metatarsal bones and phalanges; the front part of the foot.
References in periodicals archive ?
For starters, if you're a forefoot striker, you're not going to enjoy the relatively thin cushioning on the front.
"Usually, patients with forefoot pain have limited range of motion in the ankle, which may cause an early heel rise and place more pressure on the ball of the foot," explains Kim.
Ninety percent of the body's weight is then redistributed and supported by the metatarsal heads of the forefoot, the area of the foot just before the toes.
Previous studies show that one potential approach for runners trying to cut the chances of injury is to adopt an impact-absorbing forefoot strike--which Davis herself, a barefoot runner, uses, but even the committed heel-striker can learn from the gliders, Davis asserts.
Another piece of Nike technology on the forefoot is the 10-millimeter Zoom unit that gives added cushion and propulsion in the region.
In the second logistic regression model fit, we relate the health status (neuropathic, neuroischaemic, or PAD; healthy or DM healthy) to two predictors, which include temperature and forefoot location, whether medial, central, or lateral.
However, for a more specific treatment plan it would be advantageous to understand the possible abnormalities and pathomechanics of the forefoot and rearfoot (calcaneus).
There's hard rubber in the outsole's heel, and sticky rubber in the forefoot for enhanced traction.
[8] Gait retraining regimens generally focus on a transition from rear foot to midfoot or forefoot strike, increasing cadence, or altering proximal mechanics.
The static pedobarographic evaluation revealed significantly higher values in terms of forefoot peak pressure, total plantar force and total contact area in subject without RUGARN plantar, compared to subjects with RUGARN plantar.
Hyperkeratosis is caused by excessive mechanical loading, which is more likely on bony prominences of the forefoot such as MTHs [6].