ancestor

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an·ces·tor

(an'ses-tōr),
A person in the direct line of descent from which a subject of interest is derived (for example, parents or grandparents; but no collaterals or descendants).

ancestor

(ăn′sĕs′tər)
n.
1. A person from whom one is descended, especially if more remote than a grandparent; a forebear.
2. Biology The actual or hypothetical organism or stock from which later kinds evolved.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is a book that would have pleased the author's adopted forebears, Machiavelli and Marx.
Our forebears felt compelled to leave the comparative safety of their own hearths and go on pilgrimage, a wearying, sometimes terrifying, life- threatening trudge along muddy rutted roadways that bore no resemblance whatsoever to a super-highway.
This means that I can never rest on my laurels and feel self-satisfied because of what Britain did to my forebears. Rather, I should work with others to repair and apologize for the bad that my country has done and continues to do.
Joining Peter Gay, Mason argues that our forebears did enjoy sex, and when they didn't, it probably meant they had fewer pressures on them to perform than we do.
Or is this government, like the previous administration, going to sit idly by, moaning about water conservation and proving yet again that they do not have even the vestige of the vision and ability of their last century forebears? IAN MCNICHOLAS Ebbw Vale
Hoping to learn why his forebears abandoned generations of farming in 1933, he travels to their former home in Sutherland.
Like their postmodernist forebears, the new generation--Gunter, Francisco Lopez, Steve Roden, and William Basinski--begin with found sound; yet these neo-modernists take care to abstract their raw material beyond recognition, stretching and layering it into dense drones and loops.
The pair plan to meet on the summit to begin a year of celebrations marking the 50th anniversary of their forebears' historic 1953 climb.
Like his famous theatrical forebears, the actresses Kate and Ellen Terry, Gielgud cried easily: The Gielguds and the Terrys, he quipped, shared "weak lachrymal glands."
I have also come to recognize that maligning the beliefs of the vast majority of the human race is tantamount to judging one's own forebears as ignorant and unworthy of respect.
"Donne's Catholic Heritage" is the subject of Part One, which "traces the active involvement of two generations of Donne's forebears in political opposition to Tudor religious reform" (15).
However, with the views he holds for the elderly, perhaps he has no forebears at all, but was hatched from an egg which had addled slightly during incubation.