forced feeding

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feeding

 [fēd´ing]
1. the taking of food.
2. the giving of food.
3. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as providing nutritional intake for a patient who is unable to feed self.
artificial feeding feeding of a baby with food other than mother's milk.
bottle feeding in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as preparation and administration of fluids to an infant via a bottle.
breast feeding breastfeeding.
enteral tube feeding in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as delivering nutrients and water through a gastrointestinal tube.
forced feeding administration of food by force to those who cannot or will not receive it.
intravenous feeding administration of nutrient fluids through a vein; see also intravenous infusion and parenteral nutrition.
feeding procedures in the omaha system, any method of giving food or fluid, including breast, formula, intravenous, or tube.
supplemental feeding a planned additional food or nutrient that is added to the usual diet, often as a powder, formula, or tablet.
tube feeding see tube feeding.

forced feed·ing

, forcible feeding
1. giving liquid food through a nasal tube passed into the stomach;
2. forcing a person to eat more food than desired.
Synonym(s): forced alimentation
Eating disorders The self-administration of excess quantities of food in the context of the binge-purge complex
Human rights Forced alimentation The administration of nutrients against the will of the recipient

forced feed·ing

, forcible feeding (fōrst fēd'ing, fōr'si-bĕl)
1. Giving liquid food through a nasal tube that passes into the stomach.
2. Forcing a person to eat more food than desired.

forced feed·ing

, forcible feeding (fōrst fēd'ing, fōr'si-bĕl)
1. Giving liquid food through a nasal tube passed into the stomach.
2. Forcing a person to eat more food than desired.
References in periodicals archive ?
As Howlett points out, "Suffragist visual representations of forcible feeding inevitably risked being" misinterpreted (14).
women in prison watching the waning of the light and knowing that, when the light fades, it is only a question of minutes before torture--one can call it by no other name--is inflicted on their helpless bodies." But this "torture," she adds, remains hidden "at the bottom of a prison cell, where there will be no witnesses and no appeal." (20) In this light, the forcible feeding of British suffragettes can be read as a fusion between the modern focus on criminal intention--for example, the impulsion to induce the subject to act in complicity with his or her own subjection--on one hand, and the impress of an anachronistic regression to torture--for example, the direct use of violence to annihilate the criminal in the name of sovereign power--on the other.
(17.) Howlett notes that forcible feeding was already practiced on the insane and so cast "a slur on the suffragettes' sanity" (17).
Images and narratives of forcible feeding position the female speaking subject as spectacle.
Second, Barnes's essay explores the limits of performative activism and presents itself as an alternative to the British suffragettes' narratives and images of forcible feeding (which make spectacular the female body in pain and encourage activism from a female spectator).
Many of the interviews conducted between 1913 and 1915 (that is, conducted during the period in which Barnes underwent forcible feeding) expose the structure of the interview without reproducing its desired outcome of a narrative of self-exposure.
In other words, Barnes loses not just her looks, but her ability to look through the medical investigation of forcible feeding. The look, which I earlier associated with Barnes's own investigations of celebrities, is now associated with medical (and masculine) authority.
I concentrate on the discourse of the gaze here, for Barnes's narrative abandons the discourse of feminist resistance and collective oppression that conventionally accompanies British narratives of forcible feeding. When the reenactment of the drama of feminist activism is restaged as a drama of scoptic power, the question becomes whether there is a space for feminine resistance in the realm of the specular (more specifically, in the pages of the New York World Magazine or in the genre of performative journalism).
The challenge is to make sense of Barnes's exhibitionism and her play with "spectacular confession" in terms of feminist politics and to examine her performance against and alongside the narratives and images of forcible feeding produced by British suffragettes.
The Daily Sketch printed photographs showing re-enactments of the forcible feeding, while two feature writers on the Daily News resigned.
Winson Green had raised the stakes in the women's war, and hunger strikes and forcible feeding were to dominate the policy of the WSPU over the next five years.