forceps


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forceps

 [for´seps] (L.)
a two-bladed instrument with a handle, used for compressing or grasping tissues in surgical operations, handling sterile dressings, and other purposes.
alligator forceps a grasping forceps with a scissorlike handle and blades opening in a vertical plane similar to the jaws of an alligator.
bayonet forceps a forceps whose blades are offset from the axis of the handle.
capsule forceps a forceps for removing the lens capsule in cataract.
Chamberlen forceps the original form of obstetric forceps, invented in the sixteenth century.
clamp forceps a forceps-like clamp with an automatic lock, for compressing arteries or other structures.
dressing forceps forceps with scissor-like handles for grasping lint, drainage tubes, etc., in dressing wounds.
Magill forceps forceps used to introduce an endotracheal tube into the trachea during nasotracheal intubation.
obstetric forceps forceps for extracting the fetal head from the maternal passages.
Obstetric forceps and their application. From McKinney et al., 2000.
rongeur forceps a forceps designed for use in cutting bone.
thumb forceps a forceps with serrated blades and with or without teeth.
tissue forceps a forceps without teeth or with one or more small teeth at the end of each blade, designed for handling tissues with minimal trauma during surgery.

for·ceps

, pl.

forceps

,

forcepses

(fōr'seps), The singular form of this word is forceps, not forcep.
1. An instrument to grasp a structure, for compression or traction. Compare: clamp.
2. Bands of white fibers in the brain, major forceps, and minor forceps.
[L. a pair of tongs]

forceps

(fôr′səps, -sĕps)
n. pl. forceps
1. An instrument resembling a pair of pincers or tongs, used for grasping, manipulating, or extracting, especially such an instrument used by a surgeon.
2. A pincerlike pair of movable appendages at the posterior end of the abdomen in certain insects, such as earwigs.

forceps

Ob/Gyn A 2-part surgical instrument that articulates–hinges at the center—which is placed around the neonatal head to extract an infant in an operative vaginal delivery Complications Subdural or cerebral hemorrhage, facial nerve injury, brachial plexus injury, mechanical ventilation. See BiCOAG bipolar forceps, Biopsy forceps, Bissinger detachable bipolar coagulation forceps, Cold cup forceps, Mosquito forceps, Mousetooth forceps. Cf Vacuum extraction.

for·ceps

(fōr'seps)
1. An instrument for seizing a structure and making compression or traction.
Compare: clamp
2. [TA] Bands of white fibers in the brain, major forceps and minor forceps.

forceps

Surgical instruments made in a wide variety of sizes and designs for different purposes, but all having opposing blades or surfaces, that are smooth, serrated or toothed, and that can be pressed together. Forceps are used to grasp or compress tissue, to extract objects, or to hold needles, swabs, LIGATURES or other medical items.

for·ceps

(fōr'seps)
An instrument to grasp a structure, for compression or traction.
References in periodicals archive ?
But the request was refused and 10 hours later, she was seen by a consultant who said the baby must be turned using forceps.
The Scanzoni maneuver with forceps could save the day when you need assistance the most.
In a few cases the forceps could not be inserted to the full length due to thick subcutaneous tissue of the anterior neck.
The worms are coughed up by the patient or removed with forceps during bronchoscopy.
Dr Darshana Weerasena, an obstetrician and gynaecology surgeon, was surprised to see him use the forceps twice and said Mr Watson's grip was also 'very unusual'.
It was decided they would go ahead with a forceps delivery after Ms Liller's pregnancy was induced ( with the possibility a Caesarean may have to be carried out.
Dr Paturi, who was the second doctor to attempt to free the child's head during the birth, said: ``I did not apply forceps to disimpact the baby's head.
Megan's mother, Sarah, 30, of Walsgrave, Coventry, said the force of the forceps pulled her down the delivery table.
Problems had been reported with the forceps with some surgeons using too much power and others failing to operate them properly, he said.
Each implant is grasped by surrounding its tip with a ring-tipped forceps. The tip is delivered out of the incision by lifting the ring-tipped forceps handle toward the patient's shoulder (Figure 1).
The use of forceps has been implicated as a possible cause of decreased intelligence scores.